bottled water bottled water

In a file photo from 2004, a sign at the entrance to the Arrowhead Mountain Spring Water Company bottling plant, owned by Swiss conglomerate Nestlé, on the Morongo Indian Reservation near Cabazon, Calif. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

A water distribution center on Dort Highway in Flint, Mich. Stephen Carmody/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Stephen Carmody/Michigan Radio

In Flint, Residents Scramble To Get The Last Cases Of State-Provided Bottled Water

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A water bottle is filled with sparkling water at a public fountain in a park in Paris. The city's mayor hopes the free bubbly water will help persuade residents to give up plastic bottles in favor of tap water. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

To Burst The Bottle Bubble, Fountains In Paris Now Flow With Sparkling Water

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Bike patrol volunteers give directions to visitors at Acadia National Park. The Trump administration has rolled back an Obama-era policy put in place to encourage national parks to end the sale of bottled water. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Third-graders Ezekiel White (right) and Emanuel Black push a jug of water to the cafeteria at Southwest Baltimore Charter School. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Before Flint, Lead-Contaminated Water Plagued Schools Across U.S.

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Kids and teens should get two to three quarts of water per day, via food or drink, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Got Water? Most Kids, Teens Don't Drink Enough

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The amount of water to make the bottle could be up to six or seven times what's inside the bottle, according to the Water Footprint Network. Steven Depolo/Flickr hide caption

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Steven Depolo/Flickr