milk milk

Because of layers of material that can be difficult to separate, many containers for juices and broths have traditionally been destined for landfills. But recycling them is getting easier. KidStock/Getty Images hide caption

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KidStock/Getty Images

Some of the "milks" on offer by Elmhurst Milked, which operated as a traditional dairy in New York for nearly 100 years. These days, Elmhurst has replaced cows with nuts, oats and rice. Courtesy of Elmhurst Milked hide caption

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Courtesy of Elmhurst Milked

Already, Ripple has expanded its offerings to include a creamy half-and-half and, this month, a Greek-style yogurt, both of which can be used in cooking. Caitlin Maddox-Smith/Ripple Foods hide caption

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Caitlin Maddox-Smith/Ripple Foods

Migrant Justice activists gather to celebrate the signing of an agreement with Ben & Jerry's that took two years to negotiate. Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio

glass of milk Andrew Unangst/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Unangst/Getty Images

Why Are Americans Drinking Less Cow's Milk? Its Appeal Has Curdled

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An investigation by The Washington Post looked at the differences between organic milk that comes from large dairies and the milk that comes from smaller operations. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Just How Organic Is Your Milk? Well, It Depends On The Dairy It Came From

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David Fuller has been a dairy farmer since 1977. He gets about the same amount of money for milk these days he did when he started. Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Rebecca Sananes/Vermont Public Radio

Companies are selling "milk" derived from a wide variety of plants. The dairy industry isn't happy about it. Bob Chamberlin/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Bob Chamberlin/LA Times via Getty Images

Soy, Almond, Coconut: If It's Not From A Cow, Can You Legally Call It Milk?

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To protest against the falling prices of dairy and meat, farmers pour liters of milk in front of a prefecture in northwestern France in January. Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images

There's a growing body of evidence challenging the notion that low-fat dairy is best. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

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Mary Lou Wesselhoeft is a dairy farmer in the Florida Panhandle. Her Ocheesee Creamery pasteurized skim milk has nothing added — and that's the problem. According to regulations, without added vitamins, it can only be sold as "imitation skim milk." Courtesy of Institute for Justice hide caption

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Courtesy of Institute for Justice