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Somalia famine

A girl poses for a portrait in a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of Baidoa, Somalia, on Dec. 14. As people flee their homes because of drought, famine and fighting, camps have sprung up this year around the Somali capital and other cities. Luke Dray for NPR hide caption

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Luke Dray for NPR

This is what displaced Somalians want you to know about their humanitarian crisis

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Acutely malnourished child Sacdiyo Mohamed, 9 months old, is treated at Banadir hospital in Somalia on Saturday. Somalia's government has declared the drought there a national disaster. Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP hide caption

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Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP

Displaced families line up to receive food rations at a feeding center in Somalia. Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images

Somali civilians line up for food during the famine this year. Militants are banning relief agencies who warn a quarter of a million Somalis are at risk of starvation. Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP hide caption

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Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP

Children from southern Somalia fill jugs with water at a refugee camp in Mogadishu Tuesday. The number of people fleeing famine-hit areas of Somalia is likely to rise dramatically and could overwhelm international aid efforts in the Horn of Africa, a U.N. aid official said Tuesday. Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP hide caption

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Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP

Somali refugees wait at dawn at a registration center at the Dadaab refugee complex in Kenya Tuesday, to receive aid after having been displaced from their homes in southern Somalia by famine. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images

Monday (July 18, 2011): At a refugee camp near Mogadishu, a Somali woman cries after the death of one of her children. Mustafa Abdi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mustafa Abdi/AFP/Getty Images

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton

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