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Prime Minister of Norway Erna Solberg stands during a press conference with European Commission President on December 3, 2013 after a working session at the EU Headquarters in Brussels. GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

The Nordic Paradox

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The journey up the west coast of Norway, from the city of Kristiansand in the south to the city of Trondheim, now takes about 21 hours and requires seven ferry crossings. The Norwegian Public Roads Administration plans a nearly $40 billion transport project that would cut travel time in half. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Norway Embarks On Its Most Ambitious Transport Project Yet

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World War II Norwegian resistance fighter Joachim Roenneberg, seen here in 2013, has died at age 99. He led a team that was credited with slowing Hitler's plan to build atomic weapons. Andrew Winning/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Winning/Reuters

Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg speaks during a joint statement with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday. The following day, Solberg apologized to the "German girls" who faced government retaliation for their relationships with occupying German forces during World War II. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

A 19th-century scientist who told cooks to stop adding flour at the end of cooking traditional Norwegian porridge faced the wrath of a nation. Kjerstin Gjengedal/Getty Images hide caption

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Kjerstin Gjengedal/Getty Images

President Trump listens as Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg speaks at a joint news conference Wednesday. At an Oval Office meeting on immigration policy, Trump said the U.S. should want more people from countries like Norway, disparaging Haiti and what he called "shithole countries" in Africa. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'Racist' And 'Shameful': How Other Countries Are Responding To Trump's Slur

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A girl in a park in Managua, Nicaragua. The country topped the list for gains in happiness. Nicolas Garcia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Garcia/AFP/Getty Images

Global Ranking Of Happiness Has Happy News For Norway And Nicaragua

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A radio in Norway, photographed in 2009. The country is shutting down its FM network this year and switching to digital radio. Stig Morten Waage/Flickr hide caption

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Stig Morten Waage/Flickr

Norway's Veronica Kristiansen is challenged by Sweden's Angelica Wallen (left) as she tries to score during the women's quarterfinal handball match between Norway and Sweden on Tuesday. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Ben Curtis/AP

In The Summer Games, Norway Rallies Around Its Women's Handball Team

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President Obama is interviewed by NPR's Steve Inskeep at the White House on Monday. Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

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Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Obama Cautions Against 'Hysteria' Over Brexit Vote

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The Cedid atlas was "the first Muslim-published world atlas based on European geographic knowledge and cartographic methods," the Library of Congress writes. The National Library of Norway just discovered a previously unknown copy in their collection, after a reference librarian posted a scan of it to Reddit. Nikolaj Blegvad/The National Library of Norway hide caption

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Nikolaj Blegvad/The National Library of Norway

Anders Breivik raises his fist in a right-wing salute after being sentenced to 21 years in prison at the Oslo District Court on Aug. 24, 2012. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

Two men sit inside the chapel at Halden prison in far southeast Norway in this picture taken in 2010. Prisoners here spend 12 hours a day in their cells, compared to many U.S. prisons where inmates spend all but one hour in their cell. STR/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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STR/Reuters/Landov

In Norway, A Prison Built On Second Chances

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