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A female adult head louse clings to a hair plucked from a human scalp. The brown line visible inside the insect, on the left side of its body, is its last blood meal. Lice typically eat a few times a day. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

Genetically modified "gene drive" mosquitoes feed on warm cow's blood. Scientists hope these mosquitoes could help eradicate malaria. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab

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This granary weevil has set up shop inside a kernel. Even without wings, these stealthy stowaways — with the help of humans — have managed to infest grains all over the world for thousands of years. Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source

Jacob Katz, with California Trout, says growing bugs in rice fields could be part of the solution for boosting salmon populations in rivers statewide. Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Capital Public Radio

Edible winged ants are placed atop a fish fillet at Insects in the Backyard, a high-end bug-based bistro in Bangkok. Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

The destructive diamondback moth has spread across the world and mutated to become immune to each new chemical pesticide designed to slay it. Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images

This wounded ant (Megaponera analis), with two termites clinging to it, is alive but likely too exhausted after battle to get back to the nest without help. Frank et al./Science Advances hide caption

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Frank et al./Science Advances

No Ant Left Behind: Warrior Ants Carry Injured Comrades Home

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Charlie and Lois O'Brien pose for a portrait inside their home in Green Valley, Ariz., on March 8. The couple spent six decades collecting more than a million insects. Deanna Dent/ASU Now hide caption

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Deanna Dent/ASU Now

The marmalade hoverfly might not be the flashiest bug under the sun, but researchers say it "does some very important jobs." Clifton Beard/Flickr hide caption

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Clifton Beard/Flickr

Bugs Abound: If You Think The Skies Are Crowded, You Have No Idea

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The underwater construction skills of the caddis fly larva have caught the interest of bioengineers. The larva tapes and glues pebbles together to form a sturdy protective case. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

Garden centipede (Lithobius forficatus), Lithobiidae, German cockroach (Blattela germanica), Blatellidae, Garden tiger moth (Arctia caja). Artwork by Dale Edna Evans. De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images hide caption

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De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, shown wearing one of her trademark collars in 2010, now has an insect named in her honor. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Maureen LoCascio, with the mosquito control team in Hudson County, N.J., uses a backpack sprayer to spread insecticide against mosquito larvae. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Zika, Strike Before They Fly

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Green when young, and about the size of an adult human's hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster. Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo hide caption

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Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo

Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

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Male treehoppers make their abdomens thrum like tuning forks to transmit very particular vibrating signals that travel down their legs and along leaf stems to other bugs — male and female. Courtesy of Robert Oelman hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Oelman

Good Vibrations Key To Insect Communication

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The tarantula hawk, undoubtedly eyeing its next hapless eight-legged prey. Fred Holley/Flickr hide caption

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Fred Holley/Flickr

For This Tarantula-Killing Wasp, Dinner's A Meal Best Served Living

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Brooke Borel says bedbugs were essentially wiped out after World War II thanks to DDT. It's not totally clear why they came back in the past couple of decades. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

The Creepy, Crawly World Of Bedbugs And How They Have 'Infested' Homes

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