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The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecology says suggestions that a medical abortion can be reversed after more than an hour has passed aren't supported by scientific evidence. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Abortion-rights activists gathered for a news conference in New York City Monday to protest the Trump administration's proposed restrictions on family planning providers. The rule would force any medical provider receiving federal assistance to refuse to promote, refer for, perform or support abortion as a method of family planning. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

At an October news conference, the Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus called on President Trump to reverse the administration's moves to limit women's access to birth control. Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., spoke at the lectern during the event on Capitol Hill. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Demonstrators in favor of and against abortion rights made their beliefs known during a January 2018 protest in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Dr. Kimberly Remski was told by a potential employer that she couldn't provide abortions during her free time, something she felt called to do. "I realized it was something I really needed to do," she says. Kim Kovacik for NPR hide caption

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Kim Kovacik for NPR

Protesters on both sides of the abortion debate demonstrated in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in July concerning Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation. It is thought that a challenge to Roe v. Wade could have a chance of passing now that he is confirmed. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Abortion opponents see the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court as an opportunity to push for further abortion restrictions. Abortion supporters are preparing for a fight. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

With Kavanaugh Confirmed, Both Sides Of Abortion Debate Gear Up For Battle

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Dr. Leana Wen, health commissioner for the Baltimore City Health Department, talks about the effectiveness of contraception for public school students in 2015. Wen will be the new head of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

A protester is led away by police after disrupting the second day of the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Activists from Concerned Women for America make a stop on their bus tour in Indianapolis, where Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly is facing pressure from the right as he prepares to vote on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh just weeks before Election Day. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Kavanaugh Fight Puts Vulnerable Senators In A Tight Spot

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Women protest in Buenos Aires on Thursday in support of decriminalizing abortion as Argentine lawmakers debated the measure, which was defeated in the Senate. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

For Abortion Activists In Argentina, A Campaign Waged Online Faces A Disconnect

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An abortion-rights activist reacts outside the National Congress in Buenos Aires, on Thursday to news that the Senate voted to reject a bill that would have legalized abortion. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters spread their dueling messages at a March for Life rally in 2016. Only 17 percent of Americans say they want the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling overturned, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Abortion-rights supporters in Seattle protest on Tuesday against President Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. Activists are preparing for the possibility that Kavanaugh's confirmation could weaken abortion rights. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Abortion Rights Advocates Preparing For Life After Roe v. Wade

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Trump Says He's Not Asking Justice Candidates About Abortion. Why Bother?

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President Trump spoke to March for Life participants and pro-life leaders at the White House on January 19. He has been signaling that he won't ask potential Supreme Court nominees about their positions on specific cases, but he doesn't need to — all on his short list are conservative judges. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Abortion rights supporters and opponents protest outside the Supreme Court last year. The issue of abortion will spark millions of dollars in spending on advocacy for and against President Trump's Supreme Court nominee. Zach Gibson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/AFP/Getty Images

A Lifetime Investment: Big Money Pours Into Supreme Court Battle

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The Supreme Court term that just concluded was a small taste of what is to come. In all, 13 of the cases decided by a liberal-conservative split, Justice Anthony Kennedy provided the fifth and deciding conservative vote. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

(Left to right) Democratic Sens. Joe Donnelly, Heidi Heitkamp and Joe Manchin; GOP Sens. Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski Getty Images hide caption

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5 Senators Who Will Likely Decide The Next Supreme Court Justice

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Abortion-rights proponents protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy set the stage for a battle over abortion rights unlike any in a generation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

What Justice Kennedy's Retirement Means For Abortion Rights

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