Abortion rights Abortion rights

Protesters spread their dueling messages at a March for Life rally in 2016. Only 17 percent of Americans say they want the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling overturned, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Abortion-rights supporters in Seattle protest on Tuesday against President Trump and his choice of federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his second nominee to the Supreme Court. Activists are preparing for the possibility that Kavanaugh's confirmation could weaken abortion rights. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Abortion Rights Advocates Preparing For Life After Roe v. Wade

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Trump Says He's Not Asking Justice Candidates About Abortion. Why Bother?

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President Trump spoke to March for Life participants and pro-life leaders at the White House on January 19. He has been signaling that he won't ask potential Supreme Court nominees about their positions on specific cases, but he doesn't need to — all on his short list are conservative judges. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Abortion rights supporters and opponents protest outside the Supreme Court last year. The issue of abortion will spark millions of dollars in spending on advocacy for and against President Trump's Supreme Court nominee. Zach Gibson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/AFP/Getty Images

A Lifetime Investment: Big Money Pours Into Supreme Court Battle

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The Supreme Court term that just concluded was a small taste of what is to come. In all, 13 of the cases decided by a liberal-conservative split, Justice Anthony Kennedy provided the fifth and deciding conservative vote. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

(Left to right) Democratic Sens. Joe Donnelly, Heidi Heitkamp and Joe Manchin; GOP Sens. Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski Getty Images hide caption

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5 Senators Who Will Likely Decide The Next Supreme Court Justice

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Abortion-rights proponents protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. The retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy set the stage for a battle over abortion rights unlike any in a generation. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

What Justice Kennedy's Retirement Means For Abortion Rights

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Activist group Solidarity with Repeal holds a rally calling for abortion rights outside Belfast City Hall last week in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The rally follows Ireland's vote to repeal a constitutional ban on abortion. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Ireland Voted To Allow Abortion. But It's Still Strictly Banned In Northern Ireland

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Leo Varadkar, Ireland's prime minister, or taoiseach, leaves a Dublin polling station after casting his vote in Friday's referendum. Varadkar has campaigned aggressively for repealing Ireland's abortion ban. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Thousands of abortion-rights opponents demonstrate in Dublin on March 10. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ireland's Abortion Referendum Is Proving Deeply Divisive

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Under rules outlined in a newly unveiled Trump administration proposal, crisis pregnancy centers and other organizations that do not provide standard contraceptive options, like birth control pills or IUDs, could find it easier to apply for Title X funds. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Under Trump, Family Planning Funds Could Go To Groups That Oppose Contraception

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President Trump speaks during the Susan B. Anthony List's 11th annual Campaign for Life Gala at the National Building Museum on Tuesday. President Trump addressed the annual gala of the anti-abortion group and urged people to vote in the midterm election. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

In a statement from the Planned Parenthood Federation of America on the rule, the group said it would not "stand by while our basic health rights are stripped away." Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Clinics That Refer Women For Abortions Would Not Get Federal Funds Under New Rule

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Abortion-rights advocate Kim Gibson, a "clinic defender," keeps watch at the entrance of the Jackson Women's Health Organization clinic, the only clinic providing abortions in Mississippi, last month. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

On March 21, 2010, Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.), alongside fellow anti-abortion Democrats, holds up a copy of an executive order from President Barack Obama guaranteeing no federal funding for abortion. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Anti-abortion activists protest in the rain in front of the Supreme Court. The court is hearing arguments Tuesday on the state of crisis pregnancy centers. Lee Sheehan/NPR hide caption

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Lee Sheehan/NPR

Justices Appear Skeptical Of Calif. Law Challenged By Anti-Abortion Centers

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Cecile Richards attends the 2017 Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Kings Theatre on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP