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Employers are using virtual reality to train millions of workers in everything from operating machines to how to handle active shooters. Courtesy of Strivr hide caption

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Courtesy of Strivr

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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A long-awaited update to federal overtime rules means about 1.3 million workers will be entitled to extra pay when they work more than 40 hours a week. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

1.3 Million More Workers Eligible For Overtime Pay, But Some Say Rules Fall Short

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Demonstrators march to McDonald's corporate headquarters in Chicago on Thursday to demand $15-per-hour wages for fast food workers. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Protests Over Sexual Harassment At McDonald's Grow As Shareholders Meet

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When Kelly O'Brien went to work at Fidelity Investments a year and a half ago, she was excited to learn the company would contribute to her student loan payments. Kelli Martin hide caption

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Kelli Martin

A New Benefit: Some Companies Help Workers Pay Down Student Loans

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Even the Federal Reserve has noticed ghosting, which it defines as "a situation where a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact." Planet Flem/Getty Images hide caption

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Planet Flem/Getty Images

In A Hot Labor Market, Some Employees Are 'Ghosting' Bad Bosses

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The sexual harassment allegations against Harvey Weinstein sparked the #MeToo movement. New York state and New York City have enacted laws requiring training to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace. Vince Bucci/Invision/AP hide caption

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Vince Bucci/Invision/AP

Amid #MeToo, New York Employers Face Strict New Sexual Harassment Laws

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Simone Grimes made secret recordings of Federal Housing Finance Agency Director Melvin Watt that she says bolster her claims of harassment, retaliation and equal-pay violations by Watt and the agency. Seanie Blue hide caption

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Seanie Blue

Bugged At Work: How Secret Recordings Are Changing The Workplace

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What Makes A Leader?

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Arby's is among seven fast-food chains that have agreed to stop limiting their workers' ability to take jobs at other restaurants in the same chain. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Fast-Food Chains Back Away From Limits On Whom They Hire

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#MeToo Complaints Swamp Human Resources Departments

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Asking questions about prior salary can be used by employers to discriminate against women and minorities who earn less, critics say. Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Neil Webb/Getty Images/Ikon Images

More Employers Avoid Legal Minefield By Not Asking About Pay History

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A federal court has sided with Aileen Rizo, who filed suit after realizing her male counterparts were being paid more. The ruling overrules a previous interpretation of the 1963 Equal Pay Act. Rizo is seen here with her daughters in a photo she provided to the AP in 2017. Aileen Rizo/AP hide caption

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Aileen Rizo/AP

Nina Irizarry says she was sexually harassed in various jobs as a contractor but didn't have a human resources person to turn to or an employer to sue. Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry hide caption

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Justin T. Shockley/Courtesy of Nina Irizarry

Unequal Rights: Contract Workers Have Few Workplace Protections

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Autumn Weese was fired — at least, she thinks she was — but found out from co-workers, not from her boss. Chandis Vaughn/Courtesy of Autumn Weese hide caption

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Chandis Vaughn/Courtesy of Autumn Weese

Fired Via Tweet, Text And Voicemail: Loss Of Job, And Respect

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