Nagasaki Nagasaki
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Nagasaki

People walk by a poster to promote the movie Oppenheimer on Friday in Tokyo. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

'Oppenheimer' finally premieres in Japan to mixed reactions and high emotions

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On July 16, 1945, scientists detonated "Gadget," the world's first atomic bomb. White Sands Missile Range Photo hide caption

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White Sands Missile Range Photo

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows Thursday in front of a memorial to people who were killed in the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Hiroshima Atomic Bombing Raising New Questions 75 Years Later

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A photograph shows Toyama, Japan, aflame after the U.S. attack on Aug. 1, 1945. Most of the city's population was left homeless. U.S. Army Air Forces hide caption

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U.S. Army Air Forces

Pope Francis observes a minute of silence in memory of the victims of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima during his visit to the city's Peace Memorial Park on Sunday. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

Secretary of State John Kerry pauses during his remarks about seeing the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and Museum, the site of the 1945 atomic bombing, during a news conference at the conclusion of the G-7 Foreign Ministers' Meetings in Hiroshima on Monday. Jonathan Ernst/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/AFP/Getty Images

Sumiteru Taniguchi, 86, a survivor of the 1945 atomic bombing of Nagasaki, walks up to deliver his speech at the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing in Nagasaki, southern Japan, on Sunday. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

A man pushes a loaded bicycle down a cleared path in a flattened area of Nagasaki more than a month after the nuclear attack in 1945. Stanley Troutman/AP hide caption

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Stanley Troutman/AP

Remembering The Horror Of Nagasaki 70 Years Later

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James Zumwalt, deputy chief of the U.S. embassy in Tokyo, offers a wreath of flowers at a ceremony marking the 66th anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images