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Specialist Mark Fitzgerald works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. Markets are down across Europe, Asia, and the U.S. as the virus spreads to more countries around the world. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Dow Tumbles More Than 1,000 Points On Fears Of Coronavirus Pandemic

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A new study found that investors were significantly more likely to bet a company's stock price was going to increase if the company had more women on staff compared with other companies. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

A man walks by an electronic stock board of a securities firm in Tokyo, on Friday. Asian stock markets slumped after Beijing responded to the Trump administration's tariff hikes by saying it may order higher import duties on a range of U.S. goods. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

A trader at the New York Stock Exchange reacts on Oct. 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones industrial average plunged more than 22 percent — the biggest single-day drop in history. Maria Bastone/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Bastone/AFP/Getty Images

When Hillary Clinton appeared to be winning the Sept. 26 debate with Donald Trump at Hofstra University, stock futures rose and so did oil prices, a report says. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

A trading hall sits empty in a securities firm in Haikou, China, Monday. Trading on the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock markets was ended before 2 p.m. Monday after shares tumbled 7 percent. Zhao Yingquan/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Zhao Yingquan/Xinhua /Landov

Iranian stockbrokers monitor share prices at the Tehran Stock Exchange in April. The historical Iran nuclear deal could open the country's market up to international investors. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Nuclear Deal Opens Up Potential For Investors In Iran's Stock Market

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