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hydration

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Busting 5 common myths about water and hydration

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A runner takes a quick drink during training at the Australian Athletics Olympic Teams training camp at Nudgee College in Brisbane, Australia. Darren England/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren England/Getty Images

Water Water Everywhere, But How Much Do You Really Need?

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A sensor developed by scientists at U.C. Berkeley can provide real-time measurements of sweat rate and electrolytes in sweat. Courtesy of Bijendra Maskey/Sunchon National University hide caption

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Courtesy of Bijendra Maskey/Sunchon National University

Want To Know What's In Your Sweat? There's A Patch For That

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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A study in mice suggests that our brains tell us when to start and stop drinking long before our bodies are fully hydrated. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

Still Thirsty? It's Up To Your Brain, Not Your Body

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Kids and teens should get two to three quarts of water per day, via food or drink, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Got Water? Most Kids, Teens Don't Drink Enough

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