addiction addiction

Julien Lavandier, a Colorado State University student, started smoking e-cigarettes as a high school sophomore. He says he's now hooked on Juul and has been unable to quit. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

He Started Vaping As A Teen And Now Says Habit Is 'Impossible To Let Go'

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From left to right: Felito Diaz, Julio Cesar Santiago, Richard Lopez and Irma Bermudez meet at Casa Esperanza, a treatment and transitional housing program in Roxbury, Mass. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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What Explains The Rising Overdose Rate Among Latinos?

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Listen: Tristan Harris, founder of Center for Humane Technology, on Morning Edition

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The revelation that a favorite uncle had died from a long-hidden drug habit shook Dr. Andrey Ostrovsky to his core. Last month Ostrovksy quit his job as Medicaid's chief medical officer and joined a group that's working to dispel the shame of addiction. Gary Waters/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images

Hospitals Brace Patients For Pain To Reduce Risk Of Opioid Addiction

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A JUUL e-cigarette for sale at Fast Eddie's Smoke Shop in Boston. The sleek devices are easy to conceal, which makes them popular with teenagers. Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

After two weeks of recovery from an addiction to opioids prescribed by her surgeon, Katie Herzog takes a walk with her dog, Pippen. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post-Surgical Patients' Opioid Addiction?

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Telemedicine For Addiction Treatment? Picture Remains Fuzzy

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Marlene Shay's (right) son Adam overdosed on heroin when he was 21 years old. His kidney and pancreas went to Karen Goodwin, a recovering addict herself. Jud Esty-Kendall/StoryCorps hide caption

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Jud Esty-Kendall/StoryCorps

After He Died From An Opioid Overdose, She Got A New Chance At Life

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The contents of a drug overdose rescue kit at a May 13, 2015, training session in Buffalo, N.Y., on how to administer naloxone, which reverses the effects of heroin and prescription painkillers. Carolyn Thompson/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Thompson/AP

To Save Opioid Addicts, This Experimental Court Is Ditching The Delays

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Third-year students at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine learn how to trim crowns and prep a tooth for a crown. They're also learning to deal with the aftereffects, studying alternatives to opioids for pain relief. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Cheung/NPR

Dental Schools Add An Urgent Lesson: Think Twice About Prescribing Opioids

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The shelter at Houston's Convention Center, seen here Aug. 29, isn't equipped to provide medication-assisted treatment for opioid abuse. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Houston Methadone Clinics Reopen After Harvey's Flooding

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Andrea Towson used heroin for more than three decades. After a near-death experience with fentanyl, she sought help. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

'That Fentanyl — That's Death': A Story Of Recovery In Baltimore

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Some medical professionals say declaring a national emergency could make Naloxone, a drug that treats opioid overdoses, more readily available. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Should The Opioid Crisis Be Declared A National Emergency?

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The morphine-like pain killer Oxycontin is just one of a number of opioids fueling a substance use crisis in the U.S. federal health officials say. And successful treatment for the substance use disorder can be costly. Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Leonard Lessin/Getty Images/Science Source

Opioid Treatment Funds In Senate Bill Would Fall Far Short Of Needs

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Babies exposed to opioids in utero may experience withdrawal symptoms at birth, but these symptoms are treatable. Typically, the babies can go home after a few days or a couple weeks. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

For Newborns Exposed To Opioids, Health Issues May Be The Least Of Their Problems

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A 1980 letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine was later widely cited as evidence that long-term use of opioid painkillers such as oxycodone was safe, even though the letter did not back up that claim. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Doctor Who Wrote 1980 Letter On Painkillers Regrets That It Fed The Opioid Crisis

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Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

GOP's Proposed Cuts To Medicaid Threaten Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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