dementia dementia

In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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A document developed by a New York end-of-life agency permits people who want to avoid the ravages of advanced dementia to make their final wishes known — while they still have the ability to do so. One version requests that all food and fluids be withheld under certain circumstances. Skynesher/Getty Images hide caption

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Skynesher/Getty Images

Antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol and risperidone are FDA-approved for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but can increase the risk of death in older people who have dementia. Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images

Risky Antipsychotic Drugs Still Overprescribed In Nursing Homes

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Caretaker Sylvana Tyralla conducts a memory exercise with AlexA nursing home residents in one of two former East German "remembrance rooms." Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Nursing Home Recreates Communist East Germany For Dementia Patients

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Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli says that while a certain amount of memory loss is a natural part of aging, what Alzheimer's patients experience is different. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Neuroscientist Predicts 'Much Better Treatment' For Alzheimer's Is 10 Years Away

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Bella and Will Doolittle started a podcast to tell their story about Bella's struggle with early-onset Alzheimer's. Brian Mann for NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann for NPR

To Help Others, One Couple Talks About Life With Early-Onset Alzheimer's

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Nora Harris, who died in October after a battle with Alzheimer's disease, signed an advance directive stipulating no care to prolong her life. Her husband took the state of Oregon to court because she was spoon-fed against her wishes. Jim Craven for KHN hide caption

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Jim Craven for KHN

Researchers find that dementia patients who engage in activities such as gathering photographs and talking about family see improvements in their quality of life and are less agitated. Owen Franken/Getty Images hide caption

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Owen Franken/Getty Images

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and endure stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Leland Bobbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Leland Bobbe/Getty Images

Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

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Greg unwinds a hose while doing some yardwork. Along with his failing memory, Greg has been experiencing secondary symptoms including paranoia, depression and slow healing. Amanda Kowalski for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Kowalski for NPR

More Than Memory: Coping With The Other Ills Of Alzheimer's

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Writer Greg O'Brien and his daughter, Colleen, play with Adeline, Greg's 8-month-old granddaughter. Eight years ago, Greg was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Alzheimer's Starts To Steal The Joy Of Being A Grandfather

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Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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A colored magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain of a 76-year-old patient with dementia shows the brain has atrophied and the dark brown fluid-filled spaces have become enlarged. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

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Zephyr/Science Source

Cancer Drug That Might Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Headed For Bigger Tests

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