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In this June 13 photo, a residence in the Figueroa neighborhood stands destroyed nine months after Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. On Wednesday a federal judge extended a temporary housing program for territory residents whose homes were destroyed. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

People are living in homes where roofs, windows, even walls are missing, using blue tarps to keep the elements at bay. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Virgin Islands Still Recovering From 2017 Hurricanes As New Season Begins

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View of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, on April 18, 2018, after a major failure knocked out the electricity leaving the entire island without power, again. The electricity was eventually restored, but 1.5 percent of customers have had no power in the eight months since Hurricane Maria destroyed the electrical grid. Jose Jimenez/Getty Images hide caption

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Jose Jimenez/Getty Images

A damaged home in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in Punta Diamante, Puerto Rico on Sept. 21, 2017. On Monday, Gov. Ricardo Rossello said the majority of federal recovery grants would go toward rebuilding homes and businesses. Jorge A Ramirez Portela/AP hide caption

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Jorge A Ramirez Portela/AP

Two evacuees look out from the entrance of the Luis Muñoz Marín public school last week in Barranquitas, Puerto Rico. Many people from Barranquitas have been living in a shelter set up in the school since Hurricane Maria destroyed their homes in September. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

Hurricanes in 2012 and 2003 submerged parking lots and park benches, and flooded businesses along Annapolis' Dock Street. City planners estimate that, given the rise in sea level, by 2100 the flood from a once-in-a-hundred-year storm would be almost twice as high as it would be if such a storm hit today. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

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