medical ethics medical ethics

Image of a CAR-T cell (reddish) attacking a leukemia cell (green). These CAR-T lymphocytes are used for immunotherapy against cancer (CAR stands for chimeric antigen receptor). After the proliferation of the CAR-expressing T cells, they are transfused back into the patient and can directly detect the cancer cells carrying the antigen. Eye of Science/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Eye of Science/Science Source

'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing Immune System Clears Key Hurdle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536812206/536887967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An 18th-century etching by artist John Kay depicts the extra tall Charles Byrne, the extra short George Cranstoun and three contemporaries of more conventional height. Byrne made his living as a professional spectacle and died at age 22 in 1783. Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images

The Saga Of The Irish Giant's Bones Dismays Medical Ethicists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514117230/520021492" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ALS patients and their families rallied for expanded access to experimental drugs in Washington, D.C. on May 11, 2015. Courtesy of Lina Clark hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Lina Clark

Patients Demand The 'Right To Try' Experimental Drugs, But Costs Can Be Steep

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517796956/518391679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The genes in mitochondria, which are the powerhouses in human cells, can cause fatal inherited disease. But replacing the bad genes may cause other health problems. Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Lonny Shavelson has studied America's experiments with aid in dying. He's now helping patients and doctors in California come to grips with the state's new law. Courtesy of PhotoWords.com hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of PhotoWords.com

This Doctor Wants To Help California Figure Out Aid-In-Dying

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481422813/481667045" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists have the ability to use DNA from three adults to make one embryo. But should they? A. Dudzinski/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
A. Dudzinski/Science Source

Babies With Genes From 3 People Could Be Ethical, Panel Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465319186/465465075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Is It Safe For Medical Residents To Work 30-Hour Shifts?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458049301/458742156" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"It would be disingenuous of me not to suggest that the link between the ... recommendations and insurance coverage hasn't put an additional focus on our work," says Dr. Michael LeFevre. Courtesy of Michael LeFevre hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Michael LeFevre

Kevin Lopez at home in Greenbelt, Md. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Will A Transplanted Hand Feel Like His Own? Surgery Raises Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395283912/397891211" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

If You Have Dementia, Can You Hasten Death As You Wished?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/382725729/385537524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.K. could become the first country to legalize the production of a human embryo from three donors. Here, the freezing platform for an embryo, top, also known as a straw, is seen at an in vitro fertilization lab. Jim Stevens/MCT/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Stevens/MCT/Landov

Jackie Fortin's daughter, Cassandra, last summer. Courtesy of Jackie Fortin hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jackie Fortin

Can Connecticut Force A Teenage Girl To Undergo Chemotherapy?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/375659085/375799706" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From her cubicle at Vital Decisions in Cherry Hill, N.J., Kate Schleicher counsels people who are seriously ill. Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

toggle caption
Emma Lee/WHYY

Hello, May I Help You Plan Your Final Months?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/339861118/343623258" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Surgeons at Methodist University Hospital in Memphis prepare to transplant a liver in 2010. Karen Pulfer Focht/The Commercial Appeal/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Pulfer Focht/The Commercial Appeal/Landov

Who Gets First Dibs On Transplanted Liver? Rules May Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/339579923/340289327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin issues a statement to the media after the execution of Clayton Lockett. Oklahoma Secretary of Safety and Security Michael C. Thompson stands behind her at the Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City. Alonzo Adams/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alonzo Adams/AP