HPV HPV

The HPV vaccine has reduced the prevalence of the cancer-causing human papillomavirus by as much as 65 percent among those who are vaccinated. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Advice For Doctors Talking To Parents About HPV Vaccine: Make It Brief

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WFYI's Jake Harper reports health stories for Side Effects Public Media in Indianapolis. His newest health anxiety stems from the human papillomavirus, or HPV. Brian Paul/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Brian Paul/Side Effects Public Media

Is 20-Something Too Late For A Guy To Get The HPV Vaccine?

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Women often save up questions for an annual office visit that they think don't warrant a sick visit to the doctor during the year, research finds. Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Pannell/Fuse/Getty Images

The human papilloma virus causes most — but not all — cases of cancer of the cervix. James Cavallini/ScienceSource hide caption

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James Cavallini/ScienceSource

Specialists Split Over HPV Test's Role In Cancer Screening

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Dr. Donald Brown inoculated Kelly Kent with the HPV vaccine in his Chicago office in the summer of 2006 — not long after the first version of the vaccine reached the market. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Two cervical cancer cells divide in this image from a scanning electron microscope. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Should HPV Testing Replace The Pap Smear?

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Convenience may be one reason why most teens haven't gotten all three HPV shots. VCU CNS/Flickr hide caption

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VCU CNS/Flickr

Parents And Teens Aren't Up To Speed On HPV Risks, Doctors Say

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University of Miami pediatrician Judith Schaechter gives a girl an HPV vaccination in 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The human papilloma virus causes most cervical cancers. That's why HPV testing is now recommended for women ages 30 to 65. Science Photo Library hide caption

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Science Photo Library

Chandra Devi lost two of her children last week when they consumed a free school lunch in Gandaman village, India. They were among 23 children who died in the tragedy. Anoo Bhuyan/NPR hide caption

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Anoo Bhuyan/NPR

An 18-year-old girl winces as she has her third and final shot of the HPV vaccine. John Amis/AP hide caption

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John Amis/AP

Doreen Ramogola-Masire, an obstetrician-gynecologist in Botswana, hopes that a simple, quick screen for cervical cancer with vinegar will catch the disease early and save women's lives. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Botswana Doctors Stop Cervical Cancer With A Vinegar Swab

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Cells gathered during a Pap test. Those on the left are normal, and those on the right are infected with human papillomavirus. Ed Uthman/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Ed Uthman/Wikimedia Commons

Doctors Revamp Guidelines For Pap Smears

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Key Panel Recommends Routine HPV Vaccination For Boys

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Bioethicists Offer Reward For Proof On HPV Vaccine Claim

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