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Used tires stacked at a Goodyear auto service location in South San Francisco, Calif., on July, 2020. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

At a White House event on October 14, President Joe Biden encouraged states and businesses to support vaccine mandates to avoid a surge in cases of Covid-19. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Biden promotes his administration's vaccine or testing requirements for workers at the Clayco construction site in Elk Grove Village, Ill., on Oct. 7. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

People walk by a sign for both a COVID-19 testing clinic and a Covid vaccination location outside of a Brooklyn, New York, hospital on March, 29 2021. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A nurse from AltaMed Health Services hands out the vaccine card to people after receiving their Covid-19 vaccine in Los Angeles, California on August 17, 2021. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden speaks about his administration's Covid-19 response in Washington, D.C., on July 6, 2021. In September, Biden announced his intention to require vaccines or testing for 80 million workers. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

A big job for small government agency. Enforce vaccine rule for 80 million workers

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Tanks of liquid nitrogen are seen at the Foundation Food Group poultry processing plant in Gainesville, Ga. Six workers died after a freezer malfunctioned in January 2021. Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images

6 Poultry Workers Died From A Nitrogen Leak. OSHA Has Issued $1 Million In Fines

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A new federal rule requires hospitals and other high-risk health care settings to implement COVID-19 safety measures, including providing personal protective equipment to workers, ensuring proper ventilation and giving workers paid time off to get vaccinated. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Workers are shown leaving the Tyson Foods pork processing plant in Logansport, Ind., in May. A House subcommittee is investigating the Trump administration's handling of COVID-19 outbreaks at meatpacking plants, focusing on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration as well as major companies Tyson, Smithfield and JBS. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Some Smithfield Foods workers and their families have protested against the company's decision not to close plants amid the coronavirus pandemic. Christina Stella/NET Radio hide caption

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Christina Stella/NET Radio

Hundreds of workers tested positive for COVID-19 at a Smithfield Foods hog-processing plant in Sioux Falls, S.D. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

U.S. Workplace Safety Rules Missing In The Pandemic

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Workers at Amazon's Staten Island, N.Y., warehouse staged a protest demanding that the facility be closed following several confirmed cases of the coronavirus among staff. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Samples of Silestone, a countertop material made of quartz. Cutting the material releases dangerous silica dust that can damage people's lungs if the exposure to the dust is not properly controlled. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

'It's Going To Get Worse': How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick

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A colored X-ray of the lungs of a patient with silicosis, a type of pneumoconiosis. The yellow grainy masses in the lungs are areas of scarred tissue and inflammation. CNRI/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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CNRI/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A worker cuts black granite to make a countertop. Though granite, marble and "engineered stone" all can produce harmful silica dust when cut, ground or polished, the artificial stone typically contains much more silica, says a CDC researcher tracking cases of silicosis. danishkhan/Getty Images hide caption

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danishkhan/Getty Images

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops

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A trailer loaded with chickens passes a federal agent outside a Koch Foods plant in Morton, Miss., on Wednesday. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Chicken Plants See Little Fallout From Immigration Raids

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OSHA says a manager's report of suspected fraudulent activity was at least partly responsible for his firing. Here, pedestrians pass in front of a Wells Fargo bank branch in New York earlier this year. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

The American Iron and Steel Institute is one of the trade groups that wants Congress to undo the stronger safety regulation enacted in 2016 by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Congress May Undo Rule That Pushes Firms To Keep Good Safety Records

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An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules

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OSHA Launches Program To Protect Nursing Employees

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