ticks ticks

A tick grasping a dinosaur feather is preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications hide caption

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Peñalver et al/Nature Communications

Amber-Trapped Tick Suggests Ancient Bloodsuckers Feasted On Feathered Dinosaurs

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The Burlingame Museum of Pez Memorabilia in California includes a comprehensive collection of Pez dispensers. Flickr user Doctor Popular/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Flickr user Doctor Popular/Flickr Creative Commons

From Pez To Ticks, 'Atlas Obscura' Discovers 'Wonderfully Specific' Museums

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Forbidding Forecast For Lyme Disease In The Northeast

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Scientists think the lone star tick (center) likely transmits Heartland disease to people. And the virus probably also circulates in deer and coyotes. iStockphoto; CDC; iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto; CDC; iStockphoto

A harmful trio (from left): a deer tick, lone star tick and dog tick. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

The Lone Star tick, common to the southeastern U.S., is responsible for inducing meat allergies in some people, scientists say. CDC Public Health Image Library hide caption

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CDC Public Health Image Library

Last year, Tom Mather caught 15,000 deer ticks in the woods of southern Rhode Island. "People really need to become tick literate," the University of Rhode Island researcher says. Brian Mullen for NPR hide caption

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Brian Mullen for NPR

To Fight Tick-Borne Disease, Someone Has To Catch Ticks

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