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The Scarcity Trap: Why We Keep Digging When We're Stuck In A Hole

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Sally Armstrong, who plays the role of ragged school teacher Miss Perkins, stands her ground. Samuel Alwyine-Mosely/NPR hide caption

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Samuel Alwyine-Mosely/NPR

A 'Ragged School' Gives U.K. Children A Taste Of Dickensian Destitution

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Former Democratic Sen. Fred Harris of Oklahoma, seen in August 2017, holds a copy of The Kerner Report, as he discusses its 50th anniversary. Harris is the last surviving member of the Kerner Commission. Russell Contreras/AP hide caption

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Russell Contreras/AP

Report Updates Landmark 1968 Racism Study, Finds More Poverty And Segregation

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Donald Trump Jr. at a photo session after visiting Trump Tower Kolkata, a Trump Organization apartment building in India. Its website says it is "synonymous with celebrated luxury." Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Photojournalist Matt Black has traveled about 100,000 miles across 46 states to document what poverty looks like across the country for his project The Geography of Poverty. This photograph was taken in Sunflower County, Miss. Matt Black/Magnum Photos hide caption

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Matt Black/Magnum Photos

'America From The Bottom': Documenting Poverty Across The Country

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The town sign stands in the snow at the entrance to Davos, Switzerland, host to the 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum taking place this week. Donald Trump will be among the attendees. David Keyton/AP hide caption

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David Keyton/AP
Sally Deng for NPR

Want To Help Someone In A Poor Village? Give Them A Bus Ticket Out

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Water polluted by mine runoff in West Virginia. Philip Alston, the U.N. envoy, cites a ranking of 178 countries by access to drinking water and sanitation. The United States trails behind many wealthy countries, coming in at No. 36. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Job candidates take a tour of the Amazon fulfillment center in Robbinsville, N.J., during a job fair last month. The Census Bureau says increased employment is what's driving higher income numbers. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Likezo Nasilele and her husband, Chipopa Lyoni, with one of their four children in the courtyard of their home in rural Zambia. They were one of hundreds of families who received regular cash payouts as part of a government experiment. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

Cash Aid Could Solve Poverty — But There's A Catch

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Denis Otieno is one of the villagers getting $22 each month from the charity GiveDirectly. He and his wife have used some of the money to buy cypress saplings. They hope to sell the trees for lumber in a few years to pay for their children's education. Nichole Sobecki for NPR hide caption

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Nichole Sobecki for NPR

How To Fix Poverty: Why Not Just Give People Money?

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Customers check out the produce at a Curbside Market truck parked at Andrews Terrace, a large apartment complex in downtown Rochester. The program is part of Foodlink's efforts to help poor communities have access to fresh and healthy foods. Courtesy of FoodLink hide caption

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Courtesy of FoodLink

Development Ventures International was the first investor in Mera Gao Power, which has designed a solar-powered microgrid to provide electricity to off-grid villages in India. Anna da Costa/Courtesy of USAID hide caption

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Anna da Costa/Courtesy of USAID