restaurants restaurants

One of Huddle House's signature dishes is the Philly Cheese Steak Tots: steak covered with cheddar cheese sauce and shredded cheese, on an open-faced omelet with Tater Tots. Huddle House hide caption

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Huddle House

Chef Grant Achatz places one of many courses on a server's tray in the Alinea restaurant kitchen in Chicago in 2008. In 2012, the restaurant got rid of reservations and started selling tickets. Earlier this summer, the company announced how effective it's been. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Want To Dine Out? You May Need To Buy Tickets — Or Bid On A Table

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A peek inside the kitchen of Next, an early adopter of the ticket system that's replacing reservations at some restaurants. Courtesy of Christian Seel hide caption

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Courtesy of Christian Seel

No More Reservations: Exclusive Restaurants Require Tickets Instead

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A new logo that is supposed to ensure a Paris restaurant's food is homemade (fait maison in French) is already stirring up controversy. Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

Kandinsky's Painting No. 201, on the left, was the inspiration for the salad on the right, which was used to test diners' appreciation of the dish. Museum of Modern Art; Crossmodal Research Laboratory hide caption

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Museum of Modern Art; Crossmodal Research Laboratory

Legume Chef Trevett Hooper and butcher Tyler Mossman with large beef cuts in the restaurant's kitchen. Ashley Rose/Courtesy of Trevett Hooper hide caption

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Ashley Rose/Courtesy of Trevett Hooper

Ranch-To-Table Trend Has Some Diners Asking: Where's The Steak?

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A new study finds restaurants that face close regional competition are more likely to post fake positive reviews for themselves and negative reviews for competitors. Jeremy Brooks/Flickr hide caption

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Jeremy Brooks/Flickr

Charlie Trotter at his restaurant in Chicago in 2012. Sitthixay Ditthavong/AP Photo hide caption

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Sitthixay Ditthavong/AP Photo

Remembering Chef Charlie Trotter, Chicago Fine-Dining Visionary

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The Brooks Brothers store on Madison Avenue in New York is planning to open a 15,000-square-foot restaurant next door. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images