restaurants restaurants

Laura Martinez may be the only blind chef in the country running her own restaurant. La Diosa opened in January. Martinez was hired directly out of culinary school by acclaimed Chicago chef Charlie Trotter and worked for him until his restaurant closed in 2012. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Chef Wants Diners To Remember Her Cooking, Not Her Blindness

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Chef Homaro Cantu holds a tomato in the kitchen of his Chicago restaurant Moto in 2007. Haute cuisine and extreme science collided in the kitchen of Chef Cantu, who took his own life Tuesday. Jeff Haynes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Haynes/AFP/Getty Images

Late Chicago Chef Sought To Open 'A New Page In Gastronomy'

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Diners fill Riverpark, a New York City restaurant, in January. Restaurateurs fear that the tipped-wage hike being proposed in New York will force them to get rid of tipping altogether. Brad Barket/Getty Images hide caption

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Brad Barket/Getty Images

Will A Tipped-Wage Hike Kill Gratuities For New York's Waiters?

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Srirupa Dasgupta opened Upohar, a restaurant and catering service, with a social mission. Her employees — primarily refugees — earn double the minimum wage. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

A Restaurant That Serves Up A Side Of Social Goals

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James Beard-award winner and Top Chef Masters star Jen Jasinski recently opened a seafood restaurant in Denver called Stoic and Genuine that features a raw bar. June Cochran/Stoic and Genuine hide caption

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June Cochran/Stoic and Genuine

Top Chefs Discover Denver's Fast-Growing Restaurant Scene

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One of Huddle House's signature dishes is the Philly Cheese Steak Tots: steak covered with cheddar cheese sauce and shredded cheese, on an open-faced omelet with Tater Tots. Huddle House hide caption

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Huddle House

Chef Grant Achatz places one of many courses on a server's tray in the Alinea restaurant kitchen in Chicago in 2008. In 2012, the restaurant got rid of reservations and started selling tickets. Earlier this summer, the company announced how effective it's been. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Want To Dine Out? You May Need To Buy Tickets — Or Bid On A Table

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A peek inside the kitchen of Next, an early adopter of the ticket system that's replacing reservations at some restaurants. Courtesy of Christian Seel hide caption

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Courtesy of Christian Seel

No More Reservations: Exclusive Restaurants Require Tickets Instead

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A new logo that is supposed to ensure a Paris restaurant's food is homemade (fait maison in French) is already stirring up controversy. Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

Kandinsky's Painting No. 201, on the left, was the inspiration for the salad on the right, which was used to test diners' appreciation of the dish. Museum of Modern Art; Crossmodal Research Laboratory hide caption

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Museum of Modern Art; Crossmodal Research Laboratory

Legume Chef Trevett Hooper and butcher Tyler Mossman with large beef cuts in the restaurant's kitchen. Ashley Rose/Courtesy of Trevett Hooper hide caption

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Ashley Rose/Courtesy of Trevett Hooper

Ranch-To-Table Trend Has Some Diners Asking: Where's The Steak?

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