bees bees

Using card with black symbols, researchers trained honeybees to understand that sugar water would always be located under a card with the least number of symbols — including when presented with a card that was totally blank. Don Farrall/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Farrall/Getty Images

Math Bee: Honeybees Seem To Understand The Notion Of Zero

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"Bee health remains of paramount importance for me," said the EU's Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, after the EU moved to ban neonicotinoid insecticides everywhere except greenhouses. Here, a bee hovers near a peach flower. Jamal Saidi/Reuters hide caption

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Jamal Saidi/Reuters

Nigel Raine keeps a collection of wild bees in his laboratory at the University of Guelph, in Canada. Farmed honeybees can compete with wild bees for food, making it harder for wild species to survive. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Honeybees Help Farmers, But They Don't Help The Environment

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A coffee farmer picks fresh coffee cherries in Colombia. New climate research suggests Latin America faces major declines in coffee-growing regions, as well as bees, which help coffee to grow. Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont hide caption

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Neil Palmer (CIAT) /University of Vermont

With an American honeybee queen for a mother and a European honeybee drone for a father, this worker bee has a level of genetic diversity unseen in the U.S. for decades. Researchers at Washington State University hope a deeper gene pool will give a new generation of honeybees much-needed genetic traits, like resistance to varroa mites. The parasite kills a third of American honeybees each year. Megan Asche/Courtesy of Washington State University hide caption

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Megan Asche/Courtesy of Washington State University

Beehives in an apiary Daniel Milchev/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Milchev/Getty Images

Beekeepers Feel The Sting Of California's Great Hive Heist

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Anthony "Tony Bees" Planakis at StoryCorps in New York City. Planakis retired from the NYPD in 2014, but still takes calls about hives and swarms. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Protect, Serve And Take Care Of The Bees

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A tractor pulls a planter while distributing corn seed on a field in Malden, Ill. Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Beekeeper Jeff Miller checks the hives on NPR's green roof in 2013. Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

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Becky Lettenberger/NPR

NPR's Bees (Moderate, Middle Of The Road Bees) Up And Left

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Bumblebees have 100,000 times fewer neurons than humans do, but they can learn new skills quickly when there's a sweet reward at the end. Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Could A Bumblebee Learn To Play Fetch? Probably

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Beekeepers Glen Andresen and Tim Wessels are trying to breed a honey bee that is more resilient to colder climates. Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pesticides called "neonics" are popular among farmers, but also have been blamed for killing bees. In Canada, the province of Ontario is trying to crack down on neonics, with mixed results. James Capaldi/Flickr hide caption

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James Capaldi/Flickr

Cut Down On Bee-Killing Pesticides? Ontario Finds It's Easier Said Than Done

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Beekeepers inspect bee frames at the Hudson Gardens community apiary near Littleton, Colo. Modeled after community gardens, community apiaries allow beekeepers to maintain hives in public spaces — and offer each tips and support. Courtesy of Hudson Gardens hide caption

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Courtesy of Hudson Gardens

Minnesota's governor has ordered new restrictions on the use of neonicotinoid pesticides, which have been blamed for killing bees. Many details of the plan, however, remain to be worked out Jim, the Photographer/Flickr hide caption

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Jim, the Photographer/Flickr

Yao honey hunter Orlando Yassene holds a male greater honeyguide temporarily captured for research in the Niassa National Reserve, Mozambique. The birds will flutter in front of people, tweet and fly from tree to tree to guide hunters to bees' nests that are hidden inside the trunks of hollow trees. This teamwork could date back thousands or even a million years. Claire Spottiswoode hide caption

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Claire Spottiswoode

How Wild Birds Team Up With Humans To Guide Them To Honey

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