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Maryann Frazier, a researcher at Penn State's Center for Pollinator Research, checks on one of her experimental honeybee hives. Frazier is testing the effects of pesticides on honeybee colonies. Lou Blouin for NPR hide caption

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Lou Blouin for NPR

Peponapis pruinosa is a species of bee in the tribe Eucerini, the long-horned bees. This bee relies on wild and cultivated squashes, pumpkins, gourds and related plants. Wikimedia/USDA hide caption

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Wikimedia/USDA

A hollow log hive in the Cevennes region of France reveals the details of circular comb architecture of the Western honeybee. New research shows the partnership between humans and bees goes back to the beginnings of agriculture. Eric Tourneret/Nature hide caption

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Eric Tourneret/Nature

Beekeeper Rob McFarland (photographed last year) inspects the beehive he keeps on the roof of his Los Angeles house. The Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to allow residents to keep beehives in their backyards. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Dry conditions in California have limited the amount of pollen and nectar bees can collect. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Drought Is Driving Beekeepers And Their Hives From California

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Penn State grad student Carley Miller holds up a bumblebee she collected from the wildflower patch on Penn State University's research farm near State College, Pa. Researchers are testing how planting "pollinator strips" of wildflowers near farm fields could help support wild bee populations. Courtesy of Lou Blouin hide caption

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Courtesy of Lou Blouin

Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight. Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

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A bumblebee collects pollen from a flower. New evidence suggests climate change has left bumblebees with a shrinking range of places to live. Yuri Kadobnovy/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnovy/AFP/Getty Images

Buzz Kill For Bumblebees: Climate Change Is Shrinking Their Range

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The White House announced an action plan Tuesday aimed at reversing dramatic declines in pollinators like honeybees, which play a vital role in agriculture, pollinating everything from apples and almonds to squash. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Pollinator Politics: Environmentalists Criticize Obama Plan To Save Bees

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A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower. Albin Andersson/Nature hide caption

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Albin Andersson/Nature

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

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The decline of honeybees has been attributed to a variety of causes, from nasty parasites to the stress of being transported from state to state to feed on various crops in need of pollination. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

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