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Dry conditions in California have limited the amount of pollen and nectar bees can collect. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Drought Is Driving Beekeepers And Their Hives From California

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Penn State grad student Carley Miller holds up a bumblebee she collected from the wildflower patch on Penn State University's research farm near State College, Pa. Researchers are testing how planting "pollinator strips" of wildflowers near farm fields could help support wild bee populations. Courtesy of Lou Blouin hide caption

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Courtesy of Lou Blouin

Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight. Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

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A bumblebee collects pollen from a flower. New evidence suggests climate change has left bumblebees with a shrinking range of places to live. Yuri Kadobnovy/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnovy/AFP/Getty Images

Buzz Kill For Bumblebees: Climate Change Is Shrinking Their Range

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The White House announced an action plan Tuesday aimed at reversing dramatic declines in pollinators like honeybees, which play a vital role in agriculture, pollinating everything from apples and almonds to squash. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Pollinator Politics: Environmentalists Criticize Obama Plan To Save Bees

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A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower. Albin Andersson/Nature hide caption

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Albin Andersson/Nature

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

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The decline of honeybees has been attributed to a variety of causes, from nasty parasites to the stress of being transported from state to state to feed on various crops in need of pollination. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

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A bumble bee gathers pollen in September 2007 on a sunflower at Quail Run Farm in Grants Pass, Ore., where farmer Tony Davis depends on them to pollinate crops. Bees are being wiped out by a mysterious condition known as colony collapse disorder. Jeff Barnard/AP hide caption

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Jeff Barnard/AP

Beehive designer Johannes Paul (right) and Natural England's ecologist Peter Massini, with a brood frame colonized with bees from the "beehaus" beehive on the roof of his house in London in 2009. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

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Sang Tan/AP

Beekeepers demonstrate at the EU headquarters in Brussels Monday, as lawmakers vote on whether to ban pesticides blamed for killing bees. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

Workers clear honey from dead beehives at a bee farm east of Merced, Calif. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Are Agriculture's Most Popular Insecticides Killing Our Bees?

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Wild bees, such as this Andrena bee visiting highbush blueberry flowers, play a key role in boosting crop yields. Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner hide caption

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Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner

Wild Bees Are Good For Crops, But Crops Are Bad For Bees

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