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The Gulf Livestock 1 cargo vessel sails through Port Phillip heading into Bass Strait in Australia in April 2019. Japanese rescuers were searching Thursday for the livestock ship carrying more than 40 crew members and thousands of animals. Graham Flett/AP hide caption

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Graham Flett/AP

The crumpled carcass of a bull lies on U.S. Forest Service ground. It was among several killed and mutilated this summer in eastern Oregon. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

'Not One Drop Of Blood': Cattle Mysteriously Mutilated In Oregon

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Cows graze on a grass field at a farm in Schaghticoke, N.Y. The grass-fed movement is based on the idea of regenerative agriculture. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration quickly identified romaine lettuce as the source of a months-long outbreak, but the foodborne illness investigation has been one of the agency's most complicated in years. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

What Sparked An E. Coli Outbreak In Lettuce? Scientists Trace A Surprising Source

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Some of the cattle grazing on the Persson Ranch are tracked using blockchain technology, which may allow consumers to know where their meat comes from and more. Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio

Where's The Beef? Wyoming Ranchers Bet On Blockchain To Track It

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Southeast Oregon rancher Rancher Wayne Evans says he'll make it through this short water year, but it could cost him as much as $100,000 in lost hay, lost weight on his calves and equipment for hauling water to his livestock. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

Deepening Drought In Western U.S. Costs Ranchers Money And Heartache

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Elation is an Angus bull that recently sold for $800,000. His co-owner, Brian Bell, sells Elation's semen for $50 a sample, about double the going rate. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Sale Tambaya, a cattle herder in central Nigeria, grazes his cows. After his home state criminalized open grazing on Nov. 1, he and his family fled with their livestock to a neighboring state where grazing is allowed. Two of his sons died on the journey. Tim McDonnell for NPR hide caption

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Tim McDonnell for NPR

Researchers have won a prize for discovering that a cow's genetics determine which microbes populate its gut. Some of those microbes produce the greenhouse gas methane that comes out of cow belches and farts and ends up in the atmosphere. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

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Charlie Litchfield/AP

As the drought has extended into yet another rainy season, some herders walk for hours to get to this dam. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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Eyder Peralta/NPR

As The Climate Changes, Kenyan Herders Find Centuries-Old Way Of Life In Danger

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Cattle grazing in southwestern Colombia. This combination of nutritious grasses and trees, known as silvopastoralism, can increase farm production and aid the environment. Courtesy of Neil Palmer/CIAT hide caption

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Courtesy of Neil Palmer/CIAT

Chris Green, a tribal member, and his son get the dogs out early to round up a herd at Big Cypress Reservation. Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative hide caption

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Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative

South Florida's Seminole Cowboys: Cattle Is 'In Our DNA'

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An illustration of rinderpest in the Netherlands in the 18th century. Europeans once feared the cattle virus as much as they did the Black Death. Jacobus Eussen/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Jacobus Eussen/Wikimedia Commons

Rounding Up The Last Of A Deadly Cattle Virus

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Cattle stand in floodwaters at 44 Farms in Cameron, Texas. The water demolished fences and ruined crops planted as feed. Katlin Mazzocco/44 Farms hide caption

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Katlin Mazzocco/44 Farms

Texas Cattle Ranchers Whipsawed Between Drought And Deluge

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