cattle cattle

Elation is an Angus bull that recently sold for $800,000. His co-owner, Brian Bell, sells Elation's semen for $50 a sample, about double the going rate. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Sale Tambaya, a cattle herder in central Nigeria, grazes his cows. After his home state criminalized open grazing on Nov. 1, he and his family fled with their livestock to a neighboring state where grazing is allowed. Two of his sons died on the journey. Tim McDonnell for NPR hide caption

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Tim McDonnell for NPR

Researchers have won a prize for discovering that a cow's genetics determine which microbes populate its gut. Some of those microbes produce the greenhouse gas methane that comes out of cow belches and farts and ends up in the atmosphere. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

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Charlie Litchfield/AP

As the drought has extended into yet another rainy season, some herders walk for hours to get to this dam. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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Eyder Peralta/NPR

As The Climate Changes, Kenyan Herders Find Centuries-Old Way Of Life In Danger

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Cattle grazing in southwestern Colombia. This combination of nutritious grasses and trees, known as silvopastoralism, can increase farm production and aid the environment. Courtesy of Neil Palmer/CIAT hide caption

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Courtesy of Neil Palmer/CIAT

Chris Green, a tribal member, and his son get the dogs out early to round up a herd at Big Cypress Reservation. Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative hide caption

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Carlton Ward Jr/National Geographic Creative

South Florida's Seminole Cowboys: Cattle Is 'In Our DNA'

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An illustration of rinderpest in the Netherlands in the 18th century. Europeans once feared the cattle virus as much as they did the Black Death. Jacobus Eussen/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Jacobus Eussen/Wikimedia Commons

Rounding Up The Last Of A Deadly Cattle Virus

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Cattle stand in floodwaters at 44 Farms in Cameron, Texas. The water demolished fences and ruined crops planted as feed. Katlin Mazzocco/44 Farms hide caption

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Katlin Mazzocco/44 Farms

Texas Cattle Ranchers Whipsawed Between Drought And Deluge

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Dan Byers, an elite-cattle breeder, checks the heartbeat on a newborn calf, born from an embryo implanted in a surrogate heifer. Because the calf was delivered via C-section, he sprinkles sweet molasses powder on her to prompt the surrogate mother cow to lick her clean. Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media

Donnell Brown and another cowboy move a grouping of bulls from one pen to another on rib-eye ultrasound day in March at the R.A Brown Ranch. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

How Texas Ranchers Try To Clinch The Perfect Rib-Eye

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Cattle in holding pens at the Simplot feedlot located next to a slaughterhouse in Burbank, Washington on Dec. 26, 2013. Merck & Co Inc is testing lower dosages of its controversial cattle growth drug Zilmax drug in an effort to resume its sales to the $44 billion U.S. beef industry. Ross Courtney/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ross Courtney/Reuters/Landov

Black Angus cattle in pens outside the sale barn at 44 Farms, a 3,000-acre ranch in Cameron, Texas. The cattle were on display for bidders ahead of 44 Farms' fall auction in October. Andrew Schneider/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Andrew Schneider/Houston Public Media

No 'Misteak': High Beef Prices A Boon For Drought-Weary Ranchers

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Miller with one of his cows. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

For Many, Farming Is A Labor Of Love, Not A Living

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A line of fire turns brown grass into black earth. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Fire-Setting Ranchers Have Burning Desire To Save Tallgrass Prairie

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A tall, rubbery weed with golden flowers Dalmatian toadflax is encroaching on grasslands in 32 U.S. states. pverdonk/Flickr hide caption

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pverdonk/Flickr

In Ranchers Vs. Weeds, Climate Change Gives Weeds An Edge

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Beef cattle stand in a barn on the Larson Farms feedlot in Maple Park, Ill. Daniel Acker/Landov hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Landov

Inside The Beef Industry's Battle Over Growth-Promotion Drugs

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