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The booming real estate market has driven up prices to the point where Rhode Island now has the most expensive farmland in the country. The state is trying to preserve some land for farmers. Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images

Rhode Island Bets The Farm That Cheap Land Will Help Local Agriculture Thrive

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The Diamond B Ranch, north of Cheyenne, Wyo., is no longer a working property. It's been bought and subdivided by a realty company. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio

Rural Lands At Risk As Ranchers Prepare For Retirement

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Arkansas farmer David Wildy inspects a field of soybeans that were damaged by dicamba. The pesticide ban is tied up in courts, leaving farmers uncertain about what to plant. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

A field of recently-sprouted grain sorghum in Lyford, Texas, shown in a photograph from May 2013. In the latest salvo of a growing trade war, China announced a temporary 179 percent tariff on the U.S. crop. Christopher Sherman/AP hide caption

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Christopher Sherman/AP

Deb Gangwish inspects soil on her farm near Shelton, Neb. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

A Grass-Roots Movement For Healthy Soil Spreads Among Farmers

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Hog farmers worry that they will pay a hefty price if there's a trade war with China. Red Cedicol/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Red Cedicol/EyeEm/Getty Images

U.S. Farmers Likely To Be Among Hardest Hit By Chinese Tariffs

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In 2012, record heat throughout the U.S. farm belt curtailed crop production like this rotting corn on a farm in Bruceville, Ind. Farmers are now worried that the lack of rainfall this year could start the cycle over again. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The Theewaterskloof Dam is at just 13 percent capacity and is full of sand and dried tree trunks. About 85 miles north of Cape Town, the dam supplies both city and local farmers. Rodger Bosch/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodger Bosch/AFP/Getty Images

South African Farmers Lose Crops And Workers Amid Crippling Drought

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A head of poor-quality malt barley taken directly from a field in Power, Mont. Heat and a lack of water resulted in small and light kernels. Grain rejected for malt barley often ends up as animal feed. Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network hide caption

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Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network

Sale Tambaya, a cattle herder in central Nigeria, grazes his cows. After his home state criminalized open grazing on Nov. 1, he and his family fled with their livestock to a neighboring state where grazing is allowed. Two of his sons died on the journey. Tim McDonnell for NPR hide caption

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Tim McDonnell for NPR

Damage to soybean plants and other crops has led to arguments and strain between neighbors. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

A Wayward Weedkiller Divides Farm Communities, Harms Wildlife

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Migrant Justice activists gather to celebrate the signing of an agreement with Ben & Jerry's that took two years to negotiate. Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Kathleen Masterson/Vermont Public Radio

The destructive diamondback moth has spread across the world and mutated to become immune to each new chemical pesticide designed to slay it. Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images

Hervé Zarka uses a tool called a simoussi to rake up salt in his marshland on the island of Noirmoutier in France. He says there are many minerals in natural sea salt, such as magnesium and potassium, that aren't in industrial salt. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Harvesting Salt By Hand Is Making A Comeback In France

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Farmer Wendy Johnson markets hogs, chickens, eggs and seasonal turkeys. She also grows organic row crops at Joia Food Farm near Charles City, Iowa. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

Mueller plans to build his chicken barns in this cornfield just south of his home. His barns would house "breeders," the hens that lay the eggs that will hatch to be raised for meat. Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

The Agriculture Department established research centers in 2014 to translate climate science into real-world ideas to help farmers and ranchers adapt to a hotter climate. But a tone of skepticism about climate change from the Trump administration has some farmers worried that this research they rely on may now be in jeopardy. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media