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A wolf in its enclosure at the Hexentanzplatz zoo in Thale, northern Germany. Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert/AFP/Getty Images

Wolves Are Back In Germany, But Not Always Welcome

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At Odell Brewing Company in Fort Collins, Colo., Scott Dorsch pulls down a box of hops from the Yakima Valley in Washington, the state that grows the most hops in the nation. "We would buy more hops than what Colorado could produce," he says. Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media

Kevin Scott, a South Dakota farmer and secretary of the American Soybean Association, welcomed the deal to replace NAFTA because it preserved the market access established under the previous agreement. Courtesy of Jannell Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Jannell Scott

From The Front Lines Of NAFTA, More Relief Than Rejoicing

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Sampath, 63, planted these oil palm trees on his farm in Tamil Nadu, India, 12 years ago, but has yet to turn a profit. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

Amid Palm Oil Boycott, India Wants To Produce More Of It

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The Big Iron Farm Show draws thousands of farmers and farm equipment-makers to a fairground in West Fargo, N.D. For many this year, concerns about crop yields have been eclipsed by worries about President Trump's trade policies. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Jim Zarroli/NPR

Farmers Hope For China Trade Deal, But For Now They Worry About Tariffs' Impact

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A new report suggests that when consumers buy sustainably-certified coffee, they have little way of knowing whether or how their purchase helps growers. MediaforMedical/Michel Cardoso/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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MediaforMedical/Michel Cardoso/UIG via Getty Images

The harvest is bad for German farmers this year as the country has experienced the hottest summer on record and months without rainfall. Christian Ender/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ender/Getty Images

German Farmers Struck By Drought Fear Further Damage From Climate Change

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Workers in dust masks wash fresh red bell peppers in smoky conditions outside of Eltopia, Wash. Even with the masks, the smoke is still causing tight chests, itchy eyes and dry throats. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

As Wildfires Rage, Smoke Chokes Out Farmworkers And Delays Some Crops

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Eve Clark, 10, and Maggie Berry, 17, help with chores at Vision Aire Farms. They are seen in the barn, adjacent to the milking parlor. Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism hide caption

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Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

For Wisconsin's Dairy Farmers, Tariffs Could Reshape The Race For The Senate

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The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

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Emily Urban/NPR

Morning dew glistens on a tobacco leaf in a field outside Rolesville, N.C. Despite a worldwide decline in production, tobacco remains North Carolina's most valuable crop. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen Breed/AP

The alkali bee is slightly smaller than a honey bee, with opalescent stripes that shimmer between yellow, green, red and blue. Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting

The booming real estate market has driven up prices to the point where Rhode Island now has the most expensive farmland in the country. The state is trying to preserve some land for farmers. Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images

Rhode Island Bets The Farm That Cheap Land Will Help Local Agriculture Thrive

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The Diamond B Ranch, north of Cheyenne, Wyo., is no longer a working property. It's been bought and subdivided by a realty company. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio

Rural Lands At Risk As Ranchers Prepare For Retirement

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Arkansas farmer David Wildy inspects a field of soybeans that were damaged by dicamba. The pesticide ban is tied up in courts, leaving farmers uncertain about what to plant. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

A field of recently-sprouted grain sorghum in Lyford, Texas, shown in a photograph from May 2013. In the latest salvo of a growing trade war, China announced a temporary 179 percent tariff on the U.S. crop. Christopher Sherman/AP hide caption

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Christopher Sherman/AP

Deb Gangwish inspects soil on her farm near Shelton, Neb. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

A Grass-Roots Movement For Healthy Soil Spreads Among Farmers

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Hog farmers worry that they will pay a hefty price if there's a trade war with China. Red Cedicol/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Red Cedicol/EyeEm/Getty Images

U.S. Farmers Likely To Be Among Hardest Hit By Chinese Tariffs

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