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Melodie Beckham (left), here with her daughter, Laura, had metastatic lung cancer and chose to stop taking medical marijuana after it failed to relieve her symptoms. She died a few weeks after this photo was taken. Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News

Honolulu attorney Michael Green, right, sits with his client, the former Hawaii Emergency Management Agency employee who sent a false missile alert to residents and visitors in Hawaii, left, during an interview with reporters on Feb. 2, 2018 in Honolulu. The ex-state employee says he's devastated about causing panic, but he believed it was a real attack at the time. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Who Should Warn The Public Of Nuclear War?

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Blood quantum was initially a system that the federal government placed onto tribes in an effort to limit their citizenship. Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images

So What Exactly Is 'Blood Quantum'?

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D.C. Appeals Court Rules For Teen Seeking Abortion While In U.S. Illegally

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Hit-and-run accidents in California decreased by as much as 10 percent after the state passed a law in 2013 granting driver's licenses to unauthorized immigrants, say researchers at Stanford University. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Code for America founder and Executive Director Jennifer Pahlka speaks Nov. 10 at The New York Times DealBook Conference at Lincoln Center in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for The New York Ti hide caption

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How Can You Bring Innovation To Government Services? Follow Users

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Walter Shaub Jr. is the director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, which has tweeted about President-elect Donald Trump's potential conflicts of interest — and ethics. U.S. Office of Government Ethics hide caption

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U.S. Office of Government Ethics

High on President-elect Donald Trump's list of activities for his first 100 days is a hiring freeze on all civilian federal jobs that aren't in public safety. Tom Thai/Flickr hide caption

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Tom Thai/Flickr

Trump Wants A Federal Hiring Freeze, But It May Not Save Money

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Workers at the Department of Homeland Security's National Operations Center in 2015. The Obama administration proposes $3.1 billion in upgrades to federal computer systems. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Syrian refugee Maryam al-Jaddou sits with her children Maria (left) and Hasan in their apartment in Dallas. Jaddou says she decided to leave Syria in 2012 after her family's home in Homs was bombed and there was nowhere safe left to live. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

A beach near the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, which was expanded earlier this month, and is considered a sacred place by Native Hawaiians. Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images

An abandoned house at the west end of Shishmaref, Alaska, sits on the beach after sliding off during a fall storm in 2005. Diana Haecker/AP hide caption

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Diana Haecker/AP

Threatened By Rising Seas, Alaska Village Decides To Relocate

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For Vernon Lee of the Moapa Band of Paiutes, a national monument designation for Gold Butte would be the next best thing to having the U.S. government return the land to his people. Kirk Siegler hide caption

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Kirk Siegler

In Nevada, Tribes Push To Protect Land At The Heart Of Bundy Ranch Standoff

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The process of transitioning from one presidential administration to another is complex and starts months before voters even pick the next president. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

With White House Help, Clinton And Trump Start Transition Planning

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Many Western ranchers don't own much land themselves and rely on vast tracts of federal land for grazing. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Even With Bundy Behind Bars, 'Range War' Lives On For Some Ranchers

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Illinois spent $170 million to build the Thomson Correctional Center in Thomson, Ill. The prison is at the heart of many residents' discontent with state and federal government this election. David McGuffin/NPR hide caption

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The View From Thomson, Ill.

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A U.S. flag hangs over a sign in front of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters on Tuesday near Burns, Ore. An armed group has occupied the refuge since the weekend. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Why There's No Sign Of Law Enforcement At Site Of Oregon Takeover

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House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio (right) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky have two weeks to negotiate a plan with congressional Democrats to avert a government shutdown. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Leah Bannon (sitting) works on her laptop at 18F, a GSA project that aims to make government websites more user friendly and change the way government buys IT systems. Emily Jan/NPR hide caption

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Emily Jan/NPR

Remaking The U.S. Government's Online Image, One Website At A Time

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