farm bill farm bill

The House bill calls for $65 million in loans and grants, administered by the USDA, to establish "association-style" health plans that likely wouldn't have to cover hospitalization, prescription drugs or emergency care. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Who speaks for rural America? Farmers want international trade deals and relief from regulations. But small towns are focused on re-inventing themselves to attract a new generation. FrankvandenBergh/Getty Images hide caption

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FrankvandenBergh/Getty Images

Farmers Are Courting Trump, But They Don't Speak For All Of Rural America

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A farmer deposits harvested corn outside a grain elevator in Virginia, Ill., in 2015. Corn and soy have fallen, and farmers are receiving payments under a new program. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that total government aid to farmers will swell to $23.9 billion in 2017. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Three years ago, Air Force veteran Sara Creech quit her job as a nurse and bought a 43-acre farm in North Salem, Ind. She named her farm Blue Yonder Organic. John Wendle for Harvest Public Media hide caption

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John Wendle for Harvest Public Media

These wooden tokens are handed out to shoppers who use SNAP benefits to purchase fresh produce at the Crossroads Farmers Market near Takoma Park, Md. Customers receive tokens worth twice the amount of money withdrawn from their SNAP benefits card — in other words, they get "double bucks." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

How 'Double Bucks' For Food Stamps Conquered Capitol Hill

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States are taking an out provided by Congress to avoid cutting food stamp benefits to families, many of whom already depend on food banks like the Alameda County Community Food Bank in Oakland, Calif. Antonio Mena/Courtesy of Alameda County Community Food Bank hide caption

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Antonio Mena/Courtesy of Alameda County Community Food Bank

States' Rebellion Against Food Stamp Cuts Grows

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The farm bill proposes a $1 billion cut to food stamps, which would affect nearly 850,000 struggling families who already depend on food banks like the Alameda County Community Food Bank in Oakland, Calif. Antonio Mena/Courtesy of Alameda County Community Food Bank hide caption

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Antonio Mena/Courtesy of Alameda County Community Food Bank

Small Cuts To Food Stamps Add Up To Big Pains For Many Recipients

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The new farm bill includes provisions to help livestock producers hit by natural disasters and extreme weather. Here, cattle stay warm in a barn in Illinois during this month's cold weather. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Sticker shock in the dairy aisle? If the government fails to pass the farm bill, milk prices could spike sometime after the first of the year. George Frey/Landov hide caption

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George Frey/Landov

Why $7-Per-Gallon Milk Looms Once Again

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Gracie Shannon-Sanborn, 5, holds a sign as she joins her father Allen Sanborn (L) and members of Progressive Democrats of America at a rally in front of Rep. Henry Waxman's office on June 17, 2013 in Los Angeles, Calif. The protestors asked the congressman to vote against a House farm bill, which was defeated Thursday. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

An Illinois corn and soybean farmer walks to his tractor while cultivating his field. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Congress Poised To Make Crop Insurance Subsidies More Generous

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Peanut plants grow on a Halifax, N.C., farm that received federal subsidies in 2011. Robert Willett/MCT /Landov hide caption

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Robert Willett/MCT /Landov

Farm Bill Critics Claim Partial Victory Despite Stalemate

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Dairy farmer Bob Andrews feeds heifers in the same barn his grandfather used. He says today "the harder you work, the further you get behind." David Sommerstein/NCPR hide caption

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David Sommerstein/NCPR

Milk Producers Peer Over The Dairy Cliff

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