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Lorena Bradford (left), head of accessible programs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., leads a session of the museum's Just Us program. The program gives adults with memory loss and their caregivers a chance to explore and discuss works of art in a small-group setting. Lynne Shallcross/KHN hide caption

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Lynne Shallcross/KHN

A growing number of pediatric sports medicine groups warn that when a child focuses on a single sport before age 15 or 16, they increase their risk of injury and burnout — and don't boost their overall success in that sport. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Student Athletes Who Specialize Early Are Injured More Often, Study Finds

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Seth Herald for NPR

A Peer Recovery Coach Walks The Front Lines Of America's Opioid Epidemic

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Chris Silas Neal for NPR

How Likely Is It, Really, That Your Athletic Kid Will Turn Pro?

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Why We Play Sports: Winning Motivates, But Can Backfire, Too

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