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Smoke and mirrors: Dave Arnold plays around with liquid nitrogen in a cocktail glass during his interview with NPR's Ari Shapiro. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

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Claire Eggers/NPR

From Humble Salt To Fancy Freezing: How To Up Your Cocktail Game

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The "Aroma R-evolution" kit comes with four forks and 21 vials full of aromas like olive oil, mint and smoke. You drop a dab of scented liquid onto the base of the fork, and the smell is supposed to subtly flavor the food you eat while using the utensil. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

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Claire Eggers/NPR

It's the Sichuan peppercorn in dishes like spicy ma po tofu that makes your mouth buzz. Researchers wanted to know if that buzz is connected to the tingling you feel when your foot falls asleep. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Sichuan Pepper's Buzz May Reveal Secrets Of The Nervous System

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Philip James, Chairman of CustomVine, and Kevin Boyer, President and CEO of CustomVine, film a video to promote The Miracle Machine, which turns water into wine with the use of an app. Courtesy of The Miracle Machine hide caption

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Courtesy of The Miracle Machine

Engineering the perfect cookie: You can control the diameter and thickness of your favorite chocolate chip cookies by changing the temperature of the butter and the amount of flour in the dough. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Morgan Walker/NPR

The just-released Riverbelle is one of well over 100 new apple varieties to hit markets around the world in the past six years. Courtesy of Honeybear Brands hide caption

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Courtesy of Honeybear Brands

A civet cat eats red coffee cherries at a farm in Bondowoso, Indonesia. Civets are actually more closely related to meerkats and mongooses than to cats. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images