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Samin Nosrat travels to different countries to learn how salt, acid, fat and heat affect food on her four-part Netflix series. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

On Netflix, Chef Samin Nosrat Goes Global To Demystify 'Salt Fat Acid Heat'

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Brian Wansink demonstrates his "bottomless bowl of soup" — used to show that people eat more when served in a bowl secretly replenished from the inside — after he was awarded a 2007 Ig Nobel Prize in 2007 at Harvard University. Wansink made a name for himself producing pithy, palatable studies that connected people's eating habits with cues from their environment. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Okra slime changes when its pH changes. To make okra less slimy, says botanist Katherine Preston, cook it with an acid, which changes the properties of the molecules in the mucilage and renders it far less viscous. Southerners cook okra with tomatoes, which provide plenty of acid. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Brick transfers heat to dough more slowly than steel, allowing both pizza crust and toppings to simultaneously reach perfection. Aldo Pavan/Getty Images hide caption

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Aldo Pavan/Getty Images

The Oscar For Best Snack Goes To ... Popcorn, The 6,000-Year-Old Aztec Gold

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A block of Tomme de Savoie cheese ages with a sweater of Mucor lanceolatus fungal mold. Mucor itself doesn't have a strong taste, but more flavorful bacteria can travel far and wide along its hyphae — the microscopic, branched tendrils that fungi use to bring in nutrients. Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Benjamin Wolfe/Benjamin Wolfe

Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

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Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

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NadaMoo!'s Birthday Cake Cookie Dough vegan frozen dessert uses coconut milk as its base. Because of its fat and sugar content, many vegan dairy producers say coconut is simply the easiest vegan platform to build a milk or cream out of. But almond milk is also a common choice, in part because it's so popular with consumers. Courtesy of NadaMoo! hide caption

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Courtesy of NadaMoo!