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U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen speaks in front of a newly fortified border wall structure in Calexico, Calif. in October. A federal court ruled Monday that DHS has broad authority to waive environmental regulations in the name of border security. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

An Indian farmer burns rice stalks after harvesting the crop in fields on the outskirts of Amritsar in Punjab. Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images

What Will Persuade Rice Farmers In Punjab To Stop Setting Fires In Their Fields?

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An aerial view of Hawaii's East Island after it was struck by Hurricane Walaka last month. The island, home to endangered monk seals and Hawaiian green sea turtles, nearly disappeared after the storm. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Allagash employees Salim Raal, left, and Brendan McKay stack bottles of Golden Brett, a limited release beer fermented with a house strain of Brettanomyces yeast. The Maine brewery recently installed solar panels as part of its sustainability initiatives. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Researchers say there's growing evidence that nature has a powerful effect on us, improving both our physical and psychological health. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

A new report suggests that when consumers buy sustainably-certified coffee, they have little way of knowing whether or how their purchase helps growers. MediaforMedical/Michel Cardoso/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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MediaforMedical/Michel Cardoso/UIG via Getty Images

Nicolas Hulot, the French environmental minister, departs a weekly Cabinet meeting in Paris in February. "I don't want to give the illusion that my presence in government means we're answering these issues properly," Hulot said in resigning Tuesday. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

Activists from Concerned Women for America make a stop on their bus tour in Indianapolis, where Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly is facing pressure from the right as he prepares to vote on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh just weeks before Election Day. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Kavanaugh Fight Puts Vulnerable Senators In A Tight Spot

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Waste engineer Jenna Jambeck of the University of Georgia surveys plastic waste in a southeast Asian village, where it will be recycled to make raw material for more plastic products. Jambeck advises Asian governments on how to keep plastic trash out of waterways. Courtesy of Amy Brooks hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Brooks

We're Drowning In Plastic Trash. Jenna Jambeck Wants To Save Us

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An Indonesian ranger inspects a peat forest fire in Aceh province in July 2017. Indonesia, unlike most of the world, lost less overall tree cover than usual last year. Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images

Johanna Humphrey, left, ended up with 24 boxes of crayons she didn't need. She gave them to teacher Laura Smith, right, through the Buy Nothing Project. It encourages people to share without money changing hands. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Facebook Project Wants You To 'Buy Nothing' And Ask For What You Need

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Scott Pruitt speaks on election night 2010, after his successful campaign for Oklahoma attorney general. When Pruitt assumed office, he also took control of the state's case against the poultry industry. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

In Oklahoma, Critics Say Pruitt Stalled Pollution Case After Taking Industry Funds

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An illustration from 1870 shows Prehistoric men using wooden clubs and stone axe to fend off an attacks by a large cave bear. The cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) was a species of bear that lived in Europe during the Pleistocene and became extinct at the beginning of the Last Glacial Maximum, about 27,500 years ago. Mammoths can be seen in the background. British Library/Science Source hide caption

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British Library/Science Source

New Study Says Ancient Humans Hunted Big Mammals To Extinction

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Denver's newest skyscraper (center) followed new building codes for energy efficiency. The city wants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050. Dan Boyce for NPR hide caption

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Dan Boyce for NPR

Despite Progress, Cities Struggle With Ambitious Climate Goals

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