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Hank Pronk's two-man submarine, the Nekton Gamma, leaves the dock. Aaron Bolton/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Aaron Bolton/Montana Public Radio

Submarine Hobbyists Help Researchers On Montana's Flathead Lake

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Several of the fires burning in the Amazon rainforest can be seen even from space, as evidenced by this satellite image provided by NASA this month. Brazil's National Institute for Space Research said the country has seen a record number of wildfires this year. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

Researchers say there's growing evidence that nature has a powerful effect on us, improving both our physical and psychological health. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Bangladeshi commuters use boats to cross the Buriganga River in the capital Dhaka in 2018. In July, Bangladesh's top court granted all the country's rivers the same legal rights as humans. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images

The owner of Holiday Inn and InterContinental Hotels announced Tuesday that it will switch to bulk-size bathroom amenities across the hotel group. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

In March of 2017, the two sets of Bogotá twins, Jorge, William, Carlos and Wilber (left to right), gathered to celebrate Carlos's graduation. Diana Carolina/St. Martin's Press hide caption

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Diana Carolina/St. Martin's Press

Darrell Blatchley, environmentalist and director of D' Bone Collector Museum, shows plastic waste found in the stomach of a Cuvier's beaked whale near the Philippine city of Davao. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen speaks in front of a newly fortified border wall structure in Calexico, Calif. in October. A federal court ruled Monday that DHS has broad authority to waive environmental regulations in the name of border security. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

An Indian farmer burns rice stalks after harvesting the crop in fields on the outskirts of Amritsar in Punjab. Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images

What Will Persuade Rice Farmers In Punjab To Stop Setting Fires In Their Fields?

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An aerial view of Hawaii's East Island after it was struck by Hurricane Walaka last month. The island, home to endangered monk seals and Hawaiian green sea turtles, nearly disappeared after the storm. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Allagash employees Salim Raal, left, and Brendan McKay stack bottles of Golden Brett, a limited release beer fermented with a house strain of Brettanomyces yeast. The Maine brewery recently installed solar panels as part of its sustainability initiatives. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Researchers say there's growing evidence that nature has a powerful effect on us, improving both our physical and psychological health. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

A new report suggests that when consumers buy sustainably-certified coffee, they have little way of knowing whether or how their purchase helps growers. MediaforMedical/Michel Cardoso/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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MediaforMedical/Michel Cardoso/UIG via Getty Images

Nicolas Hulot, the French environmental minister, departs a weekly Cabinet meeting in Paris in February. "I don't want to give the illusion that my presence in government means we're answering these issues properly," Hulot said in resigning Tuesday. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

Activists from Concerned Women for America make a stop on their bus tour in Indianapolis, where Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly is facing pressure from the right as he prepares to vote on the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh just weeks before Election Day. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Kavanaugh Fight Puts Vulnerable Senators In A Tight Spot

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Waste engineer Jenna Jambeck of the University of Georgia surveys plastic waste in a southeast Asian village, where it will be recycled to make raw material for more plastic products. Jambeck advises Asian governments on how to keep plastic trash out of waterways. Courtesy of Amy Brooks hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Brooks

We're Drowning In Plastic Trash. Jenna Jambeck Wants To Save Us

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