environment environment

"I think there's a move that needs to be made toward accelerating what's already inevitable, which is a clean-energy transition that'll create jobs, safeguard our environment and reduce our dependence on foreign oil," Jay Faison told NPR. Courtesy ClearPath hide caption

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Courtesy ClearPath

Residents of Flint, Mich. (shown here in January), have been protesting the quality and cost of the city's tap water for more than a year. Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

High Lead Levels In Michigan Kids After City Switches Water Source

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In this August 2015 file photo, plants burned in the Rocky Fire are shown near Lower Lake, Calif. NPR's environment and climate change reporting encompasses related topics such as wildfires, drought, and other natural disasters. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

A diver swims in a kelp forest in California's Channel Island National Park, where several of the state's marine protected areas are located. National Park Service hide caption

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National Park Service

In California's Protected Waters, Counting Fish Without Getting Wet

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In the past decade, freshwater and sediment diverted from the nearby Mississippi River have turned what once was an open bay into a thriving wetlands area. Local environmental groups have planted thousands of cypress trees, attempting to create a marsh that will help absorb storms that pass through. Weenta Girmay for WWNO hide caption

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Weenta Girmay for WWNO

In Louisiana, Rebuilding Mother Nature's Storm Protection: A 'Living Coast'

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A town in California's Central Valley plans to transform farmland into an eco-friendly residential community. An artist's rendering shows plans for Kings River Village in Reedley, Calif. Courtesy of the City of Reedley hide caption

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Courtesy of the City of Reedley

California's Drought Spurs Unexpected Effect: Eco-Friendly Development

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A Tea Party supporter rings a bell in protest of the health care law in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, as Obamacare supporters shout behind her. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Fresh oil puddles on the white sand in Orange Beach, Ala., during the BP oil spill in 2010. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

5 Years After BP Oil Spill, Experts Debate Damage To Ecosystem

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Joshua Haggmark, Santa Barbara's water resources manager, is in charge of getting the city's desalination plant back online. Becky Sullivan hide caption

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Becky Sullivan

Will Turning Seawater Into Drinking Water Help Drought-Hit California?

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A baby orangutan wearing a diaper swings through the trees at the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Program outside Medan, capital of Indonesia's North Sumatra province. The program takes mostly orphaned orangutans, nurses them back to health and releases them back into the wild. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

As Palm Oil Farms Expand, It's A Race To Save Indonesia's Orangutans

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A demonstrator dressed as a bather protests against the rationing of water, outside the official residence of Sao Paulo's Governor Geraldo Alckmin in Sao Paulo, on Jan. 26. The banner behind him reads, "Planet Water, Dry Lives." Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Andre Penner/AP

A Historic Drought Grips Brazil's Economic Capital

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A worker installs solar panels atop a government building in Lakewood, Colo. The industry has added more than 80,000 jobs since 2010, according to The Solar Foundation. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

U.S. Solar Industry Sees Growth, But Also Some Uncertainty

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