environment environment

Waste engineer Jenna Jambeck of the University of Georgia surveys plastic waste in a southeast Asian village, where it will be recycled to make raw material for more plastic products. Jambeck advises Asian governments on how to keep plastic trash out of waterways. Courtesy of Amy Brooks hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Brooks

We're Drowning In Plastic Trash. Jenna Jambeck Wants To Save Us

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An Indonesian ranger inspects a peat forest fire in Aceh province in July 2017. Indonesia, unlike most of the world, lost less overall tree cover than usual last year. Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images

Johanna Humphrey, left, ended up with 24 boxes of crayons she didn't need. She gave them to teacher Laura Smith, right, through the Buy Nothing Project. It encourages people to share without money changing hands. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Facebook Project Wants You To 'Buy Nothing' And Ask For What You Need

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Scott Pruitt speaks on election night 2010, after his successful campaign for Oklahoma attorney general. When Pruitt assumed office, he also took control of the state's case against the poultry industry. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

In Oklahoma, Critics Say Pruitt Stalled Pollution Case After Taking Industry Funds

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An illustration from 1870 shows Prehistoric men using wooden clubs and stone axe to fend off an attacks by a large cave bear. The cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) was a species of bear that lived in Europe during the Pleistocene and became extinct at the beginning of the Last Glacial Maximum, about 27,500 years ago. Mammoths can be seen in the background. British Library/Science Source hide caption

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British Library/Science Source

New Study Says Ancient Humans Hunted Big Mammals To Extinction

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Denver's newest skyscraper (center) followed new building codes for energy efficiency. The city wants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050. Dan Boyce for NPR hide caption

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Dan Boyce for NPR

Despite Progress, Cities Struggle With Ambitious Climate Goals

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Echo, an English Labrador, narrows down the search for the ashes of Kathy Lampi's mother. She died in June, but her cremains were lost in the wildfire in October. Thomas Nash/nashpix.com hide caption

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Thomas Nash/nashpix.com

Forensic Search Dogs Sniff Out Human Ashes In Wildfire Wreckage

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Jadav Payeng, "The Forest Man of India," has planted tens of thousands of trees over the course of nearly 40 years. He has made bloom a once desiccated island that lies in the Brahamputra river, which runs through his home state of Assam. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

A Lifetime Of Planting Trees On A Remote River Island: Meet India's Forest Man

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Belinda Batten of Oregon State University stands in front of a wave energy generator prototype. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Oceans May Host Next Wave Of Renewable Energy

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An aerial photo shows hills of mining waste known as "chat" scattered throughout the abandoned lead and zinc mine at the Tar Creek Superfund site. Joe Wertz/Stateimpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/Stateimpact Oklahoma

EPA Vows To Speed Cleanup Of Toxic Superfund Sites Despite Funding Drop

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