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fruit flies

After scientists screened over 8,000 genes in fruit flies, only one, which hadn't been described before, triggered sleepiness. Andrew Syred/Science Source hide caption

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Andrew Syred/Science Source

Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly, is a mainstay of genetics and biology labs. Courtesy of Marcus Stensmyr hide caption

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Courtesy of Marcus Stensmyr

When And Where Fruit Flies First Bugged Humans

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Female Drosophila bifurca flies have an organ to store sperm (right) that male flies compete to fill, crowding out rivals. Scott Pitnick/Nature hide caption

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Scott Pitnick/Nature

For Female Fruit Flies, Mr. Right Has The Biggest Sperm

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Adrian G. Hunsberger, an urban horticulture agent of the University of Florida, shows a carambola, also known as starfruit. It's one of the many fruits that have been quarantined in South Florida amid concerns over an outbreak of the Oriental fruit fly. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

This Pest Has Shut Down South Florida's $700 Million Fruit Industry

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Rough night? Depending on specific tweaks to their genes, some fruit flies have trouble falling asleep, and others can't stay asleep. Getting too little shut-eye hurts their memory. David M. Phillips/Science Source hide caption

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David M. Phillips/Science Source

How Research On Sleepless Fruit Flies Could Help Human Insomniacs

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Welcome to America! Before it was spotted in Los Angeles, the fruit fly species Drosophila gentica had been seen only in El Salvador back in 1954. Courtesy of Kelsey Bailey, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. hide caption

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Courtesy of Kelsey Bailey, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

Alcohol: a key babyproofing product for this little mother. Illustration by Daniel M.N. Turner/Photos via istockphoto.com hide caption

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Illustration by Daniel M.N. Turner/Photos via istockphoto.com

A male fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) Jan Polabinski/iStockphoto hide caption

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Jan Polabinski/iStockphoto

Now we know why we'll never see a common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) sitting on a beet. Jan Polabinski/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Jan Polabinski/iStockphoto.com