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immune system

MMR — the modern combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella — provides stronger, longer-lasting protection against measles than the stand-alone measles vaccine typically given in the U.S. in the early 1960s. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Measles Shots Aren't Just For Kids: Many Adults Could Use A Booster Too

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A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows HIV particles (orange) infecting a T cell, one of the white blood cells that play a central role in the immune system. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Bone Marrow Transplant Renders Second Patient Free Of HIV

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After scientists screened over 8,000 genes in fruit flies, only one, which hadn't been described before, triggered sleepiness. Andrew Syred/Science Source hide caption

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Andrew Syred/Science Source

A scanning electron micrograph shows microglial cells (yellow) ingesting branched oligodendrocyte cells (purple), a process thought to occur in multiple sclerosis. Oligodendrocytes form insulating myelin sheaths around nerve axons in the central nervous system. Dr. John Zajicek/Science Source hide caption

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Dr. John Zajicek/Science Source

Shaorong Deng gets an experimental treatment for cancer of the esophagus that uses his own immune system cells. They have been genetically modified with the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR. Yuhan Xu/NPR hide caption

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Yuhan Xu/NPR

Doctors In China Lead Race To Treat Cancer By Editing Genes

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This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Scientists Explore Ties Between Alzheimer's And Brain's Ancient Immune System

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Alzheimer's disease causes atrophy of brain tissue. The discovery that lymph vessels near the brain's surface help remove waste suggests glitches in the lymph system might be involved in Alzheimer's and a variety of other brain diseases. Alfred Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Source

Brain's Link To Immune System Might Help Explain Alzheimer's

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Sara Wong for NPR

For People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, More Exercise Isn't Better

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In addition to profound exhaustion that isn't relieved with sleep, the illness now called ME/CFS includes flu-like symptoms, muscle pain, "brain fog" and various other physical symptoms, all of which typically worsen with even minor exertion. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images

Jack Gilbert, co-author of the book "Dirt Is Good," says kids should be encouraged to get dirty, play with animals and eat colorful vegetables. Elizabethsalleebauer/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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Elizabethsalleebauer/Getty Images/RooM RF

'Dirt Is Good': Why Kids Need Exposure To Germs

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For people with celiac disease gluten-free food is a must. A new study suggests that a common virus may trigger the onset of the disease. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images