genetics genetics

Rats have been a persistent problem for cities around the world. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Genetic Divide Between NYC's Uptown And Downtown Rats

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Kolbi Brown (left), a program manager at Harlem Hospital in New York, helps Karen Phillips sign up to receive more information about the All of Us medical research program, during a block party outside the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Troubling History In Medical Research Still Fresh For Black Americans

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Mitochondrial diseases can be passed from mothers to their children in DNA. JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Which Genes Make You Taller? A Whole Bunch Of Them, It Turns Out

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New Gene-Editing Techniques Hold the Promise Of Altering The Fundamentals Of Life

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The genes in mitochondria, which are the powerhouses in human cells, can cause fatal inherited disease. But replacing the bad genes may cause other health problems. Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Yes, getting exercise and eating right can significantly cut your risk of developing heart disease, a study finds, even if you inherited genes that predispose you to the illness. Getty Images hide caption

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Virginijus Siksnys' large research team at the Vilnius University Institute of Biotechnology in Lithuania. Arunas Silanskas/Vilnius University Institute of Biotechnology hide caption

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Arunas Silanskas/Vilnius University Institute of Biotechnology

Science Rewards Eureka Moments, Except When It Doesn't

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Simone Biles flies through the air while performing on the balance beam at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

How A 'Sixth Sense' Helps Simone Biles Fly, And The Rest Of Us Walk

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By testing tumors, researchers hoped to identify women who could avoid chemotherapy without increasing their risk of a cancer recurrence. Voisin/Phanie/Science Source hide caption

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Voisin/Phanie/Science Source

Study Of Breast Cancer Treatment Reveals Paradox Of Precision Medicine

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