genetics genetics
Stories About

genetics

UK Biobank has granted 10,000 qualified scientists access to its large database of genetic sequences and other medical data, but other organizations with databases have been far more restrictive in giving access. KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

toggle caption
KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

How Should Scientists' Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/755402750/758199447" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

UK Biobank, based in Manchester, England, is the largest blood-based research project in the world. The research project will involve at least 500,000 people across the U.K., and follow their health for next 30 years or more, providing a resource for scientists battling diseases. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

UK Biobank Requires Earth's Geneticists To Cooperate, Not Compete

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/755097434/756200324" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Altovise Ewing, who has a doctorate in human genetics and counseling, now works as a genetic counselor and researcher at 23andMe, one of the largest direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies, based in Mountain View, Calif. Karen Santos for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Santos for NPR

Overall in medical research, the proportion of participants with non-European ancestry is only about 20 percent, says Columbia University bioethicist Sandra Soo-Jin Lee. And that's a problem. Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

The genetic variation Chinese scientist He Jiankui was trying to re-create when he edited twin girls' DNA may be more harmful than helpful to health overall, a new study says. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/727957768/729390597" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People who are sensitive to the bitterness of caffeine tend to drink more coffee than others, while people sensitive to bitter flavors like quinine drink less coffee, according to a new study. Dimitri Otis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dimitri Otis/Getty Images

"Everything is private information, stored on your computer or a computer you designate," says George Church, genetics professor at Harvard Medical School, about the approach of Nebula Genomics. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for The New Yorker hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Barritt/Getty Images for The New Yorker

Startup Offers To Sequence Your Genome Free Of Charge, Then Let You Profit From It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/667946213/669145292" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

toggle caption
alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657493767/657588654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers made an important discovery in the Denisova Cave in southern Siberia. Sergei Zelensky/IAET SB RAS hide caption

toggle caption
Sergei Zelensky/IAET SB RAS

Ancient Bone Reveals Surprising Sex Lives Of Neanderthals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/640627452/641005394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

CRISPR and other gene technology is exciting, but shouldn't be seen as a panacea for treating illness linked to genetic mutations, says science columnist and author Carl Zimmer. It's still early days for the clinical applications of research. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Westend61/Getty Images

A Science Writer Explores The 'Perversions And Potential' Of Genetic Tests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/618870881/618969757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Elation is an Angus bull that recently sold for $800,000. His co-owner, Brian Bell, sells Elation's semen for $50 a sample, about double the going rate. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Joseph James DeAngelo, who authorities suspect is the so-called Golden State Killer responsible for at least a dozen murders, is arraigned in Sacramento, Calif., on Friday. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Rats have been a persistent problem for cities around the world. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The Genetic Divide Between NYC's Uptown And Downtown Rats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567572989/567572990" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript