agricultural research agricultural research
Stories About

agricultural research

Mariana Yazbek, Genebank manager, shows fava beans that are packed inside bags in the large freezer room where the seeds are stored to dry at the ICARDA research station in the village of Terbol, in the Bekaa valley, east of Lebanon, Wednesday, December 21, 2022. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dalia Khamissy for NPR

How ancient seeds in Lebanon could help us adapt to climate change

In the Bekaa Valley region of Lebanon, there is a giant walk-in fridge housing tens of thousands of seeds. They belong to the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA). Scientists from around the world use the seeds for research. ICARDA seeds have improved food security in several countries. They've transformed Ethiopian agriculture to use more drought-resistant crops. A new chickpea can be planted in winter. And now, NPR's Middle East correspondent Ruth Sherlock has found that some scientists are turning to the seed bank for answers to a hotter, drier planet. They're hoping ICARDA seeds will lead to breakthroughs in certain crops' resilience to the effects of climate change.

How ancient seeds in Lebanon could help us adapt to climate change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1159140669/1200393013" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Trump administration is moving two Department of Agriculture agencies — the National Institute for Food and Agriculture and the Economic Research Service — out of Washington, D.C. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images

Critics Of Relocating USDA Research Agencies Point To Brain Drain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/759053717/760642123" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The fruit of the baobab tree can be turned into a creamy juice. GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

How A Glass Of Juice Inspired A Town To Get Smart On Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455206545/455206546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cattle raised at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center, Neb. A New York Times investigation of animal suffering at the federal research center has prompted a USDA review. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nati Harnik/AP

A man harvests fruits of the Jatropha tree in Taabo, Ivory Coast. Jatropha, which is grown in many parts of the world, has fallen from favor as a diesel fuel substitute. Kambou Sia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kambou Sia/AFP/Getty Images

How A Biofuel Dream Called Jatropha Came Crashing Down

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/159391553/159486352" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript