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anorexia

Tessa was a chatbot originally designed by researchers to help prevent eating disorders. The National Eating Disorders Association had hoped Tessa would be a resource for those seeking information, but the chatbot was taken down when artificial intelligence-related capabilities, added later on, caused the chatbot to provide weight loss advice. Screengrab hide caption

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A recent survey found 62% of people in the U.S. with anorexia experienced a worsening of symptoms after the pandemic hit. And nearly a third of Americans with binge-eating disorder, which is far more common, reported an increase in episodes. Boogich/Getty Images hide caption

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Boogich/Getty Images

Eating Disorders Thrive In Anxious Times, And Pose A Lethal Threat

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Author Susan Burton struggled with disordered eating for decades. "Hunger was something that I believed protected me and gave me power," she says. Anna Kurzaeva/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Kurzaeva/Getty Images

From 'Empty' To 'Satisfied': Author Traces A Hunger That Food Can't Fix

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Logan Davis #1 congratulates Ohio State Buckeyes teammate Nick Oddo #15 for scoring a goal on March 22, 2014. Hannah Foslien/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Underdiagnosed Male Eating Disorders Are Becoming Increasingly Identified

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Before anorexia, Maddy Rich (left) says she never thought she was the kind of person who would struggle with an eating disorder. She gets advice on recovery from Julia Sinn. Image Courtesy of Samantha Hackett; Elizabeth Birnbaum hide caption

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Image Courtesy of Samantha Hackett; Elizabeth Birnbaum

Fighting An Eating Disorder When It's 'Hard To Want To Get Better'

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An X-ray of electrodes implanted in the brain of a Parkinson's patient at the Cleveland Clinic. Now deep brain stimulation like this is being tried experimentally in a few patients with chronic, serious anorexia. AP hide caption

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AP

Tailgaters enjoy the food before a Tennessee Titans-New Orleans Saints football game in 2007.

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Alex Brandon/AP

Eating Meals With Men May Mean Eating Less

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