al-Shabab al-Shabab

A woman grieves for her daughter, who was shot by militants during an attack on a restaurant in Mogadishu, Somalia. Early Thursday, Somali security forces ended a nightlong siege by al-Shabab extremists at the popular Pizza House restaurant in the country's capital. Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP

Somali soldiers stand guard next to wreckage from a car bomb outside the U.N.'s office in Mogadishu on Tuesday. At least 13 people were killed in twin bombings near U.N. and African Union buildings adjoining Mogadishu's airport, police said, in what the jihadist al-Shabab group claimed as a suicide attack. Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images

Fire is seen at the scene of a car bomb attack claimed by Al-Qaeda-affiliated Shabab militants on the Naasa Hablod hotel in Mogadishu on Saturday. Mohamed Abdiwahab /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mohamed Abdiwahab /AFP/Getty Images

Al-Shabab recruits walk down a street on March 5, 2012, in the Somalian capital, Mogadishu, following their graduation. The militant group has transformed from being just a Somali group to a regional network in East Africa. Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images

Al-Shabab: One Terror Group, Many Brands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/398004455/398004456" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students gather at a distance from the Garissa University College after an attack by gunmen in Garissa, Kenya, Thursday. The attack has injured dozens of people; a siege is ongoing. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Customers wait to collect money at the Juba Express money transfer company in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Feb. 12. Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images

Terrorism Fears Complicate Money Transfers For Somali-Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/389037099/389041510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Somali-American youths play basketball before the start of a September 2013 solidarity rally by the Minneapolis Somali community to denounce al-Shabab's attack of a shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Less than a decade after groups of teens from Minneapolis emigrated to Somalia to join the terrorist group, more have been recruited to join the self-declared Islamic State in Syria. Eric Miller/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Miller/Reuters/Landov

For Somalis In Minneapolis, Jihadi Recruiting Is A Recurring Nightmare

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/387302748/387302749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ahmed Ismail, a soccer coach, runs the West Bank Athletic Club in Minneapolis. His players practice near a large Somali community where young people have been recruited to fight in overseas conflicts. Craig Lassig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Lassig/AP

Yemeni soldiers hold up their weapons at an area seized from al-Qaida in the southeastern province of Shabwa, Yemen, on May 8. President Obama said Wednesday that U.S. strategy against the so-called Islamic State would be similar to how it targeted militants in Yemen and Somalia. Yemen's Defense Ministry/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Yemen's Defense Ministry/AP