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The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, right, sits on a military transport plane as it prepares to depart from Mogadishu, Somalia. Cara Anna/AP hide caption

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Cara Anna/AP

Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield says Somalia needs urgent care to avoid another famine

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Fahir Mayow holds her nephew, eight-month-old Ahmed Noor, at Banadir Hospital in Mogadishu on Monday. Ahmed arrived at the hospital one week ago, weighing 3.5 kilograms, just under 8 pounds. Luke Dray for NPR hide caption

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Luke Dray for NPR

Children reach for food handouts in the aftermath of the catastrophic flooding in Pakistan, which has destroyed rice, corn and wheat crops and left over a third of the country under water. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

A mother helps her malnourished son stand after he collapsed near their hut in the village of Lomoputh in northern Kenya on Thursday. A severe drought and spiking food prices are causing a humanitarian emergency in the Horn of Africa. Brian Inganga/AP hide caption

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Brian Inganga/AP

Workers from the garment sector block a road during a protest to demand payment of due wages, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in April. Thousands of garment workers who produce items for top Western fashion brands protested against unpaid wages, saying they were more afraid of starving than contracting the coronavirus. MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP via Getty Images

A World Food Programme worker stands next to aid parcels that will be distributed to South Sudanese refugees at the airport in Sudan's North Kordofan state. Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images

Why It's So Hard To Stop The World's Looming Famines

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Women carry food in gunny bags after visiting an aid distribution center in South Sudan on March 10. Albert Gonzalez Farran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran/AFP/Getty Images

Why The Famine In South Sudan Keeps Getting Worse

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Acutely malnourished child Sacdiyo Mohamed, 9 months old, is treated at Banadir hospital in Somalia on Saturday. Somalia's government has declared the drought there a national disaster. Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP hide caption

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Mohamed Sheikh Nor/AP

A 5-year-old child cries as a nurse struggles to find a vein for an injection at a health clinic last month in Shada, Somalia. The child's family lost all their animals to drought and traveled more than 100 miles in search of a better situation. Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

Lucia Adeng Wek holds her 3-year-old son, Wek Wol Wek, who suffers from malnutrition. They're at a clinic in South Sudan run by Doctors without Borders and were photographed on October 11, 2016. Albert Gonzalez Farran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran/AFP/Getty Images

Who Declares A Famine? And What Does That Actually Mean?

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A World Food Program food distribution site in Bentiu, South Sudan. The U.N. says nearly 5 million people in the country do not have enough food, and in one region people are already dying of starvation. Kate Holt/AP hide caption

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Kate Holt/AP

In South Sudan, People Are Dying Of Hunger As Civil War Continues

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