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Mortgage rates have been surging, making home ownership a lot less affordable for many people. The higher rates have also made people reluctant to sell their current homes, since many would likely have to pay more in mortgages for their next house. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images
Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images

Interest rates up, but not on your savings account

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Paulo Echeverry and Dahianara Lopez Zapata, at their food truck in Kissimmee, Fla. Michelle Bruzzese for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Bruzzese for NPR

Some homebuyers lose deposits of $10,000, $20,000, or more due to high mortgage rates

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Mortgage rates keep rising, making home ownership unaffordable for millions of Americans. Since the start of the year higher rates have added about $1,000 to the monthly payment to buy a typical house. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Mike Johansen stands by the door of the camping trailer where the couple is living while they wait for construction on their new home to be finished. Andrea Johansen hide caption

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Andrea Johansen

With mortgage rates near 7%, the housing party is over. Now it's hangover time

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Katrina Wooten signed a contract to buy this home that's under construction near Gainesville, Fla. Then mortgage rates jumped sharply higher. Katrina Wooten hide caption

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Katrina Wooten

Adjustable rate mortgages can be cheaper but risky. Here's what you need to know

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Ari and TR Brooks stood on the land where their new home would be built the day they agreed to buy it back in February of 2021. But the home is still not completed and mortgage rates have risen dramatically. TR Brooks hide caption

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TR Brooks

The pain of rising mortgage rates when you're waiting for your home to be built

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Did you put money down to buy a home that wasn't built yet and now are struggling to afford it because of higher mortgage rates? We want to hear from you. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Mortgage rates on 30-year, fixed-rate loans rose above 5% this week. That's pushing the cost of buying a home higher and making homeownership unaffordable for more people. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Mortgage rates just hit 5%. Here's how much more expensive that makes home ownership

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A historic drop in mortgage rates has millions of homeowners refinancing to save money. It's helping home sales, but it's not helping the broader economy as much as it would in a normal recession. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Record Low Mortgage Rates Put More Cash In Pockets, But May Not Boost Economy Much

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Coronavirus fears sent stock markets plummeting last week, but they're also pushing mortgage rates down near historical lows. That's an opportunity for homebuyers and homeowners. Steve Dipaola/Reuters hide caption

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Steve Dipaola/Reuters

Mortgage Rates Are Near All-Time Lows As Coronavirus Worries Hit Markets

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Trader Edward Curran (right) works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. As Treasury yields topped 3 percent on Tuesday, the Dow Jones industrial average tumbled. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

De Desharnais, a homebuilder and real estate agent in Nashua, N.H., stands in front of a house her company is constructing. She says her company had 32 employees at the height of the housing boom, and now only has six despite the industry's gradual recovery. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

Will A Fed Interest Rate Hike Slow The Housing Recovery?

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A sign announces that a Los Angeles house is for sale in November. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Consumer Agency Launches Tool To Help You Find A Cheaper Mortgage

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Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke during a news conference in June. Financial markets reacted to comments he made then by selling off bonds and stocks. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Investors Brace For News Out Of Fed Minutes

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