food waste food waste

United has purchased 15 million gallons of renewable jet fuel made from beef tallow, or fat, by Alt Air Fuels and plans to use the fuel this year for Los Angeles-to-San Francisco flights. Tony Ruppe/United hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Ruppe/United

Galdakao Mayor Ibon Uribe (left) and volunteer Javier Goikoetxea pose in front of the Solidarity Fridge, Spain's first communal refrigerator, shared by citizens in Galdakao, a city outside Bilbao. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Frayer for NPR

To Cut Food Waste, Spain's Solidarity Fridge Supplies Endless Leftovers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/431960054/432036132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Imperfect Produce is a new venture that's sourcing funny-looking produce and partnering with the chain Raley's to sell it at discounted prices. Courtesy of Imperfect Produce hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Imperfect Produce

Cesar Zuniga, operations manager at the Salinas Valley municipal dump in California, points to salad greens that still have two weeks before their sell-by date. "Some loads ... look very fresh," Zuniga says. "We question, wow, why is this being tossed?" Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Aubrey/NPR

Landfill Of Lettuce: Why Were These Greens Tossed Before Their Time?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/414667913/414831936" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This Alaskan cod taco with pickled radish salsa is one of several drought-friendly recipes that chef Nathan Lyon and his culinary manager, Sarah Forman, have cooked up. Courtesy of Sarah Forman hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Sarah Forman

Noemi Sosa shops at Daily Table, a nonprofit supermarket in Dorchester, Mass. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Trader Joe's Ex-President Opens Store With Aging Food And Cheap Meals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/411777947/412046980" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Mariposa border crossing, as seen from Nogales, Ariz., September 2013. This land port serves as the main point of entry into the U.S. for fresh produce from Mexico. A lot of that produce gets rejected just past the border, even though it's perfectly tasty and edible. David Kadlubowski/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
David Kadlubowski/Corbis

Lunch, Not Landfill: Nonprofit Rescues Produce Rejected At U.S. Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/398345233/398809334" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Not so ugly, eh? Supposedly imperfect produce rescued and reclaimed for consumption by Bon Appetit and Better Harvests. Far left and far right: Courtesy of Ron Clark/Better Harvests. Center three images: Courtesy of Bon Appétit Management Company hide caption

toggle caption
Far left and far right: Courtesy of Ron Clark/Better Harvests. Center three images: Courtesy of Bon Appétit Management Company

Student volunteers with The Campus Kitchens Project evaluate produce. The initiative gets high-school and college students to scavenge food from cafeterias, grocery stores and farmers' markets, cook it and deliver it to organizations serving low-income people in their communities. Courtesy of DC Central Kitchen hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of DC Central Kitchen

Oranges sit in crates at the Rancho Del Sol Organics farm in San Diego County, Calif., in 2014. A labor dispute at major West Coast ports has left millions of pounds of California oranges stranded in warehouses and on half-loaded boats. Sam Hodgson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sam Hodgson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Steve Kudlacek is an undergraduate at the University of California, Irvine who helped Professor Greg Weiss develop a way to unboil an egg. Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Zylius/UC Irvine Communications

Seattle garbage collector Anousone Sadettanh empties a small residential garbage bin into his truck in 2014. It is now illegal to toss out food with the trash in the city. Residents will get warning tags for now; the city will start imposing fines in July. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP