Slovakia Slovakia

A memorial to slain journalist Ján Kuciak and his fiancée, Martina Kusnírová, has been set up in the lobby of Aktuality.sk. Since they were killed, the news site's office building has been guarded by the police and private security guards. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Slovakia Government's Collapse Not Enough To End Protests Over Journalist's Murder

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People flash the lights of their mobile phones as they celebrate the resignation of Prime Minister Robert Fico and his government as a way out of the political crisis triggered by the killings of investigative journalist Ján Kuciak and his fiancée Martina Kusnírová, during a rally in Bratislava, Slovakia on Friday. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Darko Vojinovic/AP

Protesters holds placards during a rally last week to pay tribute to murdered Slovak journalist Jan Kuciak and his fiancee Martina Kusnirova at the Slovak National Uprising (SNP) square in Bratislava. Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

Europe's top court has dismissed a legal action by Hungary and Slovakia, which challenged a system that required them to take in refugees. Above, migrants wait to be rescued by a ship in the Mediterranean off the Libyan coast last month. Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images

Claudia Tran, 21, was born and raised in Slovakia to Vietnamese immigrants. "People here are still really surprised if I speak Slovak with them," she says. "Because the assumption is, you don't look Slovak, you aren't Slovak." Courtesy of Claudia Tran hide caption

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Courtesy of Claudia Tran

Slovakia's Migrants Keep A Low Profile In A Country Wary Of Outsiders

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Slovak language instructor Julia Vrablova sought out women who could teach her to make the dough for tahana strudla, which can be made with ground poppy seeds, apple or sour cherries. Courtesy of Sasa Woodruff hide caption

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Courtesy of Sasa Woodruff

A Traditional Strudel Recipe 'Pulled' From The Past

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