farming farming

This ancient piece of bread, more than 14,000 years old, is changing what archaeologists thought they knew about the history of food and agriculture. Amaia Arranz-Otaegui hide caption

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Amaia Arranz-Otaegui

The booming real estate market has driven up prices to the point where Rhode Island now has the most expensive farmland in the country. The state is trying to preserve some land for farmers. Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images

Rhode Island Bets The Farm That Cheap Land Will Help Local Agriculture Thrive

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Ginnie and Matt Peters on vacation in February 2011, a few months before he died by suicide. Courtesy of Ginnie Peters hide caption

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Courtesy of Ginnie Peters

'He Was My Everything': A Farmer's Wife Reflects On Her Husband's Suicide

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Deb Gangwish inspects soil on her farm near Shelton, Neb. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

A Grass-Roots Movement For Healthy Soil Spreads Among Farmers

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For decades, Washington has had eight Atlantic salmon farms. After one was destroyed in an accident last summer, the state has decided to kick the rest of them out. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Tea pickers stand in the scorching sun, hand-plucking the tea leaves for about eight hours a day. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Tea Farmer In India Leads Charge For Organic, Evades The Charge Of Elephants

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Line workers sort freshly cut avocados at Frutas Finas packing plant in Tancitaro. Forty-five percent of the world's avocados come from Mexico. Eighty percent of avocados consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, the majority from the small mountain town of Tancitaro. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Blood Avocados No More: Mexican Farm Town Says It's Kicked Out Cartels

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James Dinklage, a cattle rancher from Nebraska, is one of the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed Thursday. The suit accuses the USDA of "arbitrary and capricious" behavior in rolling back two Obama-era rules designed to protect small farmers, who say they are being exploited by the meatpacking companies they supply. Courtesy Dinklage Family/Organization for Competitive Markets hide caption

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Courtesy Dinklage Family/Organization for Competitive Markets

Soybean plants, with pods ready for harvest, in Boonsboro, Maryland. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

The Soybean Is King, Yet Remains Invisible

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Seed preservationist John Coykendall, also a trained artist, keeps detailed journals of all of his seed expeditions, something he calls "memory banking." Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

The Big Stories Behind Small Seeds: This Man Wants To Save Them All

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Not only are kids raising animals and learning the how-tos of vaccinations and record-keeping, 4-H'ers are also being taught how to add up the costs and weigh them against future profits. Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Farmer Kevin Sullivan put solar panels on a portion of his property in Suffield, Conn. Patrick Skahill/WNPR hide caption

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Patrick Skahill/WNPR

For New England Farmers Looking To Make Ends Meet, The Sun Provides A Harvest

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Wade Dooley, in Albion, Iowa, uses less fertilizer than most farmers because he grows rye and alfalfa, along with corn and soybeans. "This field [of rye] has not been fertilized at all," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Does 'Sustainability' Help The Environment Or Just Agriculture's Public Image?

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Children walk through a rice field outside the town of Kelilalina in eastern Madagascar. Rice is the dominant food and the dominant crop on the Indian Ocean island, but changing weather patterns are disrupting production in some parts of the country. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Erratic Weather Threatens Livelihood Of Rice Farmers In Madagascar

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A farmer checks on produce at Padao Farms, a 15-acre plot run by the Yang family in Fresno, Calif., that specializes in Asian greens. Courtesy of Asian Pacific Islander Forward Movement hide caption

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Courtesy of Asian Pacific Islander Forward Movement