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A farmer picks coca leaves in a field in Colombia. Joaquin Sarmiento/Getty Images hide caption

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Joaquin Sarmiento/Getty Images

Colombia Tries To Get Farmers Away From The Cocaine Biz. How's That Going?

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Josh Davis tends to his hog herd on his farm in Pocahontas, Ill. Once a popular breed, there are now only a few hundred American mulefoot hogs left. David Kovaluk/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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David Kovaluk/St. Louis Public Radio

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A female blue orchard bee forages for nectar and pollen on Phacelia tanacetifolia flowers, also known as blue or purple tansy. Blue orchard bees are solitary bees that help pollinate California's almond orchards. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

This laser unit is one of six that repel thieving birds from the blueberry fields of Meduri Farms near Jefferson, Ore. Tom Banse/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Tom Banse/Northwest News Network

Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds

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This ancient piece of bread, more than 14,000 years old, is changing what archaeologists thought they knew about the history of food and agriculture. Amaia Arranz-Otaegui hide caption

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Amaia Arranz-Otaegui

The booming real estate market has driven up prices to the point where Rhode Island now has the most expensive farmland in the country. The state is trying to preserve some land for farmers. Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol M. Highsmith/Getty Images

Rhode Island Bets The Farm That Cheap Land Will Help Local Agriculture Thrive

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Ginnie and Matt Peters on vacation in February 2011, a few months before he died by suicide. Courtesy of Ginnie Peters hide caption

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Courtesy of Ginnie Peters

'He Was My Everything': A Farmer's Wife Reflects On Her Husband's Suicide

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Deb Gangwish inspects soil on her farm near Shelton, Neb. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

A Grass-Roots Movement For Healthy Soil Spreads Among Farmers

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For decades, Washington has had eight Atlantic salmon farms. After one was destroyed in an accident last summer, the state has decided to kick the rest of them out. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Tea pickers stand in the scorching sun, hand-plucking the tea leaves for about eight hours a day. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Tea Farmer In India Leads Charge For Organic, Evades The Charge Of Elephants

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Line workers sort freshly cut avocados at Frutas Finas packing plant in Tancitaro. Forty-five percent of the world's avocados come from Mexico. Eighty percent of avocados consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, the majority from the small mountain town of Tancitaro. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Blood Avocados No More: Mexican Farm Town Says It's Kicked Out Cartels

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James Dinklage, a cattle rancher from Nebraska, is one of the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed Thursday. The suit accuses the USDA of "arbitrary and capricious" behavior in rolling back two Obama-era rules designed to protect small farmers, who say they are being exploited by the meatpacking companies they supply. Courtesy Dinklage Family/Organization for Competitive Markets hide caption

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Courtesy Dinklage Family/Organization for Competitive Markets

Soybean plants, with pods ready for harvest, in Boonsboro, Maryland. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

The Soybean Is King, Yet Remains Invisible

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Seed preservationist John Coykendall, also a trained artist, keeps detailed journals of all of his seed expeditions, something he calls "memory banking." Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

The Big Stories Behind Small Seeds: This Man Wants To Save Them All

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