farming farming

A ranch manager holds pistachios at a farm in Madera, Calif. The lifting of sanctions on Iran has California growers worried that Iranian pistachios will flood the U.S. market. Justin Kase Conder/AP hide caption

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Justin Kase Conder/AP

John Boyd Jr., with his father, John Boyd Sr. Fred Watkins /Courtesy of John Boyd Jr. hide caption

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Fred Watkins /Courtesy of John Boyd Jr.

Farmer John Boyd Jr. Wants African-Americans To Reconnect With Farming

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A chicken house in Seagrove, N.C. North Carolina is one of the country's largest poultry producers. As farms move closer to residential areas, neighbors are complaining that the waste generated is a potential health hazard. Kelly Bennett/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Kelly Bennett/MCT via Getty Images

When A Chicken Farm Moves Next Door, Odor May Not Be The Only Problem

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Millet isn't just one grain but, rather, a ragbag group of small-seeded grasses. Hardy, gluten-free and nutritious, millet has become an "it" grain in recent years. billy1125/Flickr hide caption

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billy1125/Flickr

Mariama Keita, a farmer in Senegal, uses her cellphone to figure out the best time to harvest her peanut plants. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

This Peanut Farmer Turns To A Cellphone — And Prayer — For A Top Crop

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A hollow log hive in the Cevennes region of France reveals the details of circular comb architecture of the Western honeybee. New research shows the partnership between humans and bees goes back to the beginnings of agriculture. Eric Tourneret/Nature hide caption

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Eric Tourneret/Nature

A field near harvest time at Meyers Farm in Bethel, Alaska, can now grow crops like cabbage outside in the ground, due to rising temperatures. Daysha Eaton/KYUK hide caption

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Daysha Eaton/KYUK

Rising Temperatures Kick-Start Subarctic Farming In Alaska

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Paul Mesple is a fig farmer near the Central Valley town of Chowchilla, Calif. He and his partner farm around 2,000 acres of figs. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Adrian G. Hunsberger, an urban horticulture agent of the University of Florida, shows a carambola, also known as starfruit. It's one of the many fruits that have been quarantined in South Florida amid concerns over an outbreak of the Oriental fruit fly. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

This Pest Has Shut Down South Florida's $700 Million Fruit Industry

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United has purchased 15 million gallons of renewable jet fuel made from beef tallow, or fat, by Alt Air Fuels and plans to use the fuel this year for Los Angeles-to-San Francisco flights. Tony Ruppe/United hide caption

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Tony Ruppe/United

Pizza night on the Stoney Acres Farm in Athens, Wis. John Ivanko/Courtesy of Stoney Acres Farm hide caption

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John Ivanko/Courtesy of Stoney Acres Farm

Family Farms Turn To Pizza For Fast Cash And Customers

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Not only did the family trade their urban life for one in a beautiful valley surrounded by mountains and trees, but they also earn $300,000 a year. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

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