farming farming

Workers pick asparagus in early April at Del Bosque Farms in Firebaugh, Calif. This year, some farmers in the state will get water, others won't, based on when their land was first irrigated. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Redistribute California's Water? Not Without A Fight

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An undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources of a northern long-eared bat. A fungal disease has devastated the species, now listed as threatened. AP hide caption

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AP

Federal Government Protects Bat, Angers Industry

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Dry, cracked earth is visible on a cantaloupe farm near Firebaugh, Calif., last August. Record-low snowpack levels in the Sierra Nevada mean most Central California farmers will face another year without water from the federal Central Valley Project. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Mas Masumoto grew up on his family farm southeast of Fresno, Calif. His 1987 essay "Epitaph for A Peach," in which he bemoaned the loss of heirloom flavors, captured his changing philosophy as a farmer. It also helped turn his farm into a landmark in the local-food movement. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

The Family Peach Farm That Became A Symbol Of The Food Revolution

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A field of unharvested wheat is seen in Ashby-de-la-Zouch, England, in 2012. Wheat wasn't cultivated in Britain until some 6,000 years ago, but DNA evidence suggests early Britons were eating the grain at least 8,000 years ago. Darren Staples/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Darren Staples/Reuters/Landov

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

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A cereal rye cover crop grows (at left) in a field where corn was recently harvested. Cover crops can capture nutrients such as nitrate and prevent them from polluting nearby streams. Courtesy of Paul Jasa/University of Nebraska-Lincoln hide caption

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Courtesy of Paul Jasa/University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Here's How To End Iowa's Great Nitrate Fight

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The city of Des Moines, Iowa, sits on the Raccoon and Des Moines rivers. The city's water works says it will sue three neighboring counties for high nitrate levels in these waterways. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Iowa's Largest City Sues Over Farm Fertilizer Runoff In Rivers

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Sister Elizabeth feeds Yoda, a water buffalo calf at the ranch. The nuns bought the buffalo to make mozzarella. Sonja Salzburg for Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Sonja Salzburg for Harvest Public Media

Nuns On The Ranch Give A Heavenly Twist To Beef

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Owner Mary Kraft at Badger Creek Dairy outside Fort Morgan, Colo. Luke Runyon/KUNC/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/KUNC/Harvest Public Media

Women's Work Is Never Done On The Farm, And Sometimes Never Counted

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Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

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Pinatas are among the new generation of club apples — varieties that are not just patented, but also trademarked and controlled in such a way that only a select "club" of farmers can sell them. Stemilt Growers LLC hide caption

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Stemilt Growers LLC

Want To Grow These Apples? You'll Have To Join The Club

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