farming farming

United has purchased 15 million gallons of renewable jet fuel made from beef tallow, or fat, by Alt Air Fuels and plans to use the fuel this year for Los Angeles-to-San Francisco flights. Tony Ruppe/United hide caption

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Tony Ruppe/United

Pizza night on the Stoney Acres Farm in Athens, Wis. John Ivanko/Courtesy of Stoney Acres Farm hide caption

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John Ivanko/Courtesy of Stoney Acres Farm

Family Farms Turn To Pizza For Fast Cash And Customers

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Not only did the family trade their urban life for one in a beautiful valley surrounded by mountains and trees, but they also earn $300,000 a year. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

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Pam Marrone (right), founder and CEO of Marrone Bio Innovations, inspects some colonies of microbes. Marrone has spent most of her professional life prospecting for microbial pesticides and bringing them to market. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Mighty Farming Microbes: Companies Harness Bacteria To Give Crops A Boost

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Tanimura & Antle workers use tractors to install drip tape into fields that will be used to grow lettuce and other crops in California's Salinas Valley. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

Why California Farmers Are Conflicted About Using Less Water

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Dalma Cartagena teaches a class on agricultural science to elementary-school students in Orocovis, Puerto Rico. "I'm preparing them to make good decisions when it comes to the environment and healthy foods," she says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico Is Sowing A New Generation Of Small Farmers

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Now that's a big root: Sweet potatoes aren't tubers, or thickened stems, like potatoes. Sweet potatoes are roots — swollen and packed with starch. U-ichiro Murakami/Flickr.com hide caption

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U-ichiro Murakami/Flickr.com

Workers pick asparagus in early April at Del Bosque Farms in Firebaugh, Calif. This year, some farmers in the state will get water, others won't, based on when their land was first irrigated. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Redistribute California's Water? Not Without A Fight

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An undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources of a northern long-eared bat. A fungal disease has devastated the species, now listed as threatened. AP hide caption

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AP

Federal Government Protects Bat, Angers Industry

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Dry, cracked earth is visible on a cantaloupe farm near Firebaugh, Calif., last August. Record-low snowpack levels in the Sierra Nevada mean most Central California farmers will face another year without water from the federal Central Valley Project. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Mas Masumoto grew up on his family farm southeast of Fresno, Calif. His 1987 essay "Epitaph for A Peach," in which he bemoaned the loss of heirloom flavors, captured his changing philosophy as a farmer. It also helped turn his farm into a landmark in the local-food movement. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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The Family Peach Farm That Became A Symbol Of The Food Revolution

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A field of unharvested wheat is seen in Ashby-de-la-Zouch, England, in 2012. Wheat wasn't cultivated in Britain until some 6,000 years ago, but DNA evidence suggests early Britons were eating the grain at least 8,000 years ago. Darren Staples/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Darren Staples/Reuters/Landov

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

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