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Bruce Hincks of Meadowood Farm walks through his patch of brussels sprouts in Yarmouth, Maine. Hincks, who has been farming for 40 years, said that this is the worst season, in terms of drought and heat, that he has seen in 10 or 12 years. Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Kristie and Drew Harper opened a small bistro in Brookfield, Mo. Town leaders are courting other businesses in an effort to grow the local economy. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

A weekday work session on the Student Organic Farm at Iowa State University has members weeding a perennial bed. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

At the Iowa State University Beef Nutrition Farm, the cattle eat carefully formulated rations. Researchers there are trying to test new types of animal feed. Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Iowa Public Radio

An assortment of organic vegetables is seen on display. A growing body of evidence documents how farming methods can influence the nutritional content of foods. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Farmer Aubrey Fletcher of Purdy, Mo., is one of thousands of women who have taken on leadership roles in the traditionally male-dominated agriculture industry. Despite her busy workload, Fletcher has been making the time to meet regularly with a new group of women dairy farmers in her area. Suzanne Hogan for Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Suzanne Hogan for Harvest Public Media

Big Muddy Farms, an urban farm in northern Omaha, Neb., is seen among residential homes last October. Urban farms have become a celebrated trend, yet earning a living at it is tough, a new survey finds. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

A ranch manager holds pistachios at a farm in Madera, Calif. The lifting of sanctions on Iran has California growers worried that Iranian pistachios will flood the U.S. market. Justin Kase Conder/AP hide caption

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Justin Kase Conder/AP

John Boyd Jr., with his father, John Boyd Sr. Fred Watkins /Courtesy of John Boyd Jr. hide caption

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Fred Watkins /Courtesy of John Boyd Jr.

Farmer John Boyd Jr. Wants African-Americans To Reconnect With Farming

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A chicken house in Seagrove, N.C. North Carolina is one of the country's largest poultry producers. As farms move closer to residential areas, neighbors are complaining that the waste generated is a potential health hazard. Kelly Bennett/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Kelly Bennett/MCT via Getty Images

When A Chicken Farm Moves Next Door, Odor May Not Be The Only Problem

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Millet isn't just one grain but, rather, a ragbag group of small-seeded grasses. Hardy, gluten-free and nutritious, millet has become an "it" grain in recent years. billy1125/Flickr hide caption

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billy1125/Flickr

Mariama Keita, a farmer in Senegal, uses her cellphone to figure out the best time to harvest her peanut plants. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

This Peanut Farmer Turns To A Cellphone — And Prayer — For A Top Crop

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