genetically modified food genetically modified food

Russ Kremer with some of his hogs on his farm in Frankenstein, Mo., in 2009. Instead of buying conventional feed, Kremer grazes his hogs in a pasture, and grows grains and legumes for them. Jeff Roberson /AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson /AP

Farmers harvest a sugar beet crop in Gilcrest, Colo. Matthew Staver/Landov hide caption

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Matthew Staver/Landov

Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains. Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute hide caption

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Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

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A farmer holds Monsanto's Roundup Ready soybean seeds at his family farm in Bunceton, Mo. Dan Gill/AP hide caption

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Dan Gill/AP

Protesters demonstrate against the production of genetically modified food in front of a Monsanto facility in Davis, Calif., in March. The local protest was not specifically about labeling. Randall Benton/MCT /Landov hide caption

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Randall Benton/MCT /Landov

People march demanding labels for genetically modified food near the White House in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 16, 2011. Ren Haijun/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Ren Haijun/Xinhua /Landov

Farmer Alan Madison fills a seed hopper with Monsanto hybrid seed corn near Arlington, Illinois, U.S. A group of organic and other growers say they're concerned they'll be sued by Monsanto if pollen from seeds like these drift onto their fields. Daniel Acker/Landov hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Landov